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201 George I, elector of Hanover, succeeded to the British throne on the death of Queen Anne in 1714. The succession was determined by the Act ofSettlement of 1701, which passed over the legitimate but Roman Catholic representatives of the Stuart line in favor of the Protestant house of Hanover, descended from the daughter of James I.

George quarreled both with his wife, Sophia Dorothea (1666-1726), whom he divorced and incarcerated (from 1694 until her death) in punishment forher alleged infidelity, and with his son, Prince George, who consorted with his political opponents. The prince succeeded to the throne as George II when George I died on June 12, 1727.

Died of stroke. Reigned from 1714 to 1727. 
HANOVER George I, of England
 
202 George II succeeded to the British throne and the electorate of Hanover on the death of his father, George I, in 1727. Born on Nov. 10, 1683, in Hanover, he remained largely Hanoverian in his interests, although,unlike his father, he learned fluent English. He visited the electorate regularly during most of his reign and sometimes utilized his position asking of England to the advantage of his German territory.

Although George has been represented as a king manipulated by his own ministers--notably Sir Robert Walpole and the duke of Newcastle--and byhis highly intelligent wife, Queen Caroline (1683-1737), he was by no means a weak monarch. He played a larger part in the direction of foreign and military policy than most contemporaries suspected, and at Dettingen (1743), in the War of the Austrian Succession, was the last British monarch to appear in person on the battlefield. His reign witnessed the final collapse of the Jacobites after their uprising of 1745 and closed with Britain's brilliant successes in the Seven Years' War (1756-63) under the leadership of William Pitt the Elder. George had long detested Pitt, but he eventually came to recognize his merits.

George's son, Frederick, predeceased him, so when George II died on Oct.25, 1760, he was succeeded by Frederick's son, George III. Although he was vulnerable to management by others, George II was undoubtedly aknowledgeable and skillful politician, within the narrow framework of Hanoverian interests in which he worked.

Died of aneurysm 
HANOVER George II (Augustus) of England
 
203 AFN: 9FNG-NM

George III was the longest reigning of male British monarchs. Born onJune 4, 1738, he was the son of Frederick, prince of Wales, and thegrandson of George II. He succeeded his grandfather in 1760, his fatherhaving died in 1751.

George had high but impractical ideas of kingship. On his accession he sought to rule without regard to party, to banish corruption from political practice, and to abandon the Hanoverian preoccupations of his predecessors. The chief minister chosen to implement his new system of politics, the third earl of Bute (1713-92), however, was an unpracticed politician who merely succeeded in disrupting the established politics of the day without creating a viable alternative. The result was 10 years of ministerial instability and public controversy, which ended only in 1770 with the appointment of Frederick, Lord North, an able and congenial minister.

Although never an autocratic monarch in the sense that his opponents contended, George III was always a powerful force in politics. He was a strong supporter of the war against America, and he viewed the concession of independence in 1783 with such detestation that he considered abdicating his throne. At the same time, he fought a bitter personal feud with the Whig leader Charles James Fox, and his personal intervention brought the fall of the Fox-North ministry in 1783. He then found another minister, William Pitt, the Younger, who suited him. Even as late as 1801 he preferred, however, to force Pitt to resign as prime minister rather than permit Catholic Emancipation, a measure that he interpreted as contrary to his coronation oath to uphold the Church of England.

After 1801 George III was increasingly incapacitated by an illness ,sometimes identified as porphyria, that caused blindness and senility. His recurring bouts of insanity became a political problem and ultimately compelled him to submit to the establishment of a formal Regency in 1811.The regent was his oldest son, the future George IV, one of 15 children borne him by his wife, Charlotte Sophia of Mecklenburg-Strelitz.

George III was bitterly criticized by Whig historians of his own and later days. But 20th-century scholarship has somewhat redressed the balance, and he is now seen as a strong-minded but public-spirited monarch who perhaps ascended the throne at an overly young and impressionable age. He learned quickly, however, and developed into a shrewd and sensible statesman, although one of conservative views. To the court he brought a sense of public duty and private morality that proved popular in a society already being transformed by the evangelical revival. He showed considerable interest in agricultural improvement and was an avid collector of paintings and books. The best loved of the Hanoverian rulers, he enjoyed a personal reputation that stood his house in good stead during the disastrous reign of his son George. George III died on Jan. 29, 1820.

> Can anyone point me to a good online source for the children of King
> George III of England including illegitimate, what's known of. I used
> to think there was a newsgroup for royalty but couldn't find one,
> apologies this being off-topic.

1) George, Prince of Wales, later George IV (1762-1830)
2) Frederick, Duke of York (1763-1827)
3) William, Duke of Clarence, later William IV (1765-1837)
4) Edward, Duke of Kent (1767-1820) (father of Queen Victoria)
5) Princess Augusta (1768-1840)
6) Princess Elizabeth, m. Frederick of Hesse-Homburg (1770-1840)
7) Ernest, Duke of Cumberland, later King of Hanover (1771-1851)
8) Augustus, Duke of Sussex (1773-1843)
9) Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge (1774-1850)
10) Princess Sophia (1777-1845)
11) Prince Octavius (1779-1783)
12) Prince Alfred (1780-1782)
13) Princess Amelia (1783-1810)
14) Princess Mary, m. the Duke of Gloucester (1776-1857)

George III had no illegitimate children, having a most un-Hanoverian fidelity
to Queen Charlotte. 
HANOVER George III of England
 
204 George IV, who served as prince regent from 1811 to 1820 (see Regency)before succeeding his father, George III, to the throne, brought thestanding of the British monarchy lower than at any other time in itsmodern history. Born on Aug. 12, 1762, he consorted as a young man withhis father's parliamentary opponents, including Charles James Fox. In1785 he illegally married Mrs. Maria Fitzherbert. He subsequently deniedthe marriage in order to secure Parliament's payment of his debts, and in1795 he married Princess Caroline of Brunswick, whom he later attemptedto divorce on his accession as king. Although long an ally of the Whigs,he declined to bring them into power when he became regent, and he wasthereafter associated with deeply conservative causes, especially themaintenance of official discrimination against Roman Catholics andProtestant dissenters. His personal profligacy and his treatment of QueenCaroline brought him great unpopularity. He spent extravagant sums on thearts. Some of the richest portions of the royal collection and, aboveall, the Royal Pavilion at Brighton remain as monuments to his culturalinterests. He died on June 26, 1830, and was succeeded by his brother,William IV. HANOVER George IV
 
205 Victoria, queen of Great Britain and Ireland (r. 1837-1901), the longest-reigning monarch in English history, established the monarchy asa respected and popular institution while it was irrevocably losing its place as an integral part of the British governing system.

Born in Kensington Palace, London, on May 24, 1819, Victoria was the only child of Edward, duke of Kent and son of George III, and PrincessVictoria, daughter of the duke of Saxe-Coburg. Emerging from a lonely, secluded childhood to take the throne on the death of her uncle, WilliamIV, Victoria displayed a personality marked by strong prejudices and awillful stubbornness. She was strongly attached to the Whig prime minister Lord Melbourne; after he resigned in 1839, Sir Robert Peel, his would-be successor, suggested that she dismiss the Whig ladies of hercourt. Victoria, however, refused. In part because of this "bed chamber crisis," Melbourne resumed office for two more years.

Victoria and her court were greatly transformed by her marriage to her first cousin, Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg, in 1840. Although her name now designates a supposedly prudish age, it was Albert who made a point of straitlaced behavior, and introduced a strict decorum in court. He also gave a more conservative tinge to Victoria's politics, leading her to become close to Peel. The couple had nine children. Victoria populated most of the thrones of Europe with her descendants. Among her grandchildren were Emperor William II of Germany and Alexandra, consort of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia.

Albert taught Victoria the need for hard work if she was to make her views felt in the cabinet, and during the prince's lifetime Victoria did, by insistently interjecting her opinions, force the ministers to take them into account. Opposing the policy of Lord Palmerston of encouraging democratic government on the Continent, for example, she was partlyresponsible for his departure as foreign secretary in 1851. She also helped form cabinets. Her political importance was based, however, upon the temporarily factionalized state of Commons between 1846 and 1868,when royal intervention was needed to help glue together majoritycoalitions.

Always prone to self-pity, Victoria fully indulged her grief at Albert's death in 1861. She remained in mourning until her own death, making fewpublic appearances and spending most of each year on the Isle of Wight and in the Scottish Highlands, where her closest companion was a dour Scottish servant, John Brown. Her popularity declined as a result, and republican sentiment appeared during the late 1860s.

Victoria, however, regained the people's admiration when she resumed her determined efforts to steer public affairs. She won particular esteem for defending the popular imperialist policies of the Conservative ministries of Benjamin Disraeli, who flattered her relentlessly and made her empress of India in 1876. Conversely, she flayed William E. Gladstone, theLiberal prime minister, whom she intensely disliked, for ostensibly weakening the empire. Although Victoria also attacked Gladstone for encouraging democratic trends, the celebrations of her golden and diamond jubilees in 1887 and 1897 demonstrated her great popularity.

In Victoria's later career, her attempts to influence government decisions ceased to carry significant weight. The Reform Act of 1867, by doubling the electorate, strengthened party organization and eliminated the need for a mediator--the monarch--among factions in Commons.

Victoria died on Jan. 22, 1901. She was succeeded by her son, Edward VII.Her letters have been published in three series (1907; 1926-28; 1930-32). 
HANOVER Victoria of England
 
206 Elizabeth II (Alexandra Mary) WINDSOR Queen of England is the 29th great granddaughter of Gyda HARALDSDATTER Princess of England. HARALDSDATTER Gyda, Princess of England
 
207 Census: 1881:
Source Information:LDS:
Dwelling High Lane Cottage Census Place West Hallam, Derby, England
Family History Library Film 1341811
Public Records Office Reference RG11 Piece / Folio 3392 / 93 Page Number 18

Name Relation Marital Gender Age Birthplace Occupation Disability
Joseph HARDY Head M Male 35 Bottesford, Leicester, England Ag Labourer
Harriet HARDY Wife M Female 39 Clifton, Nottingham, England Seamstress
John HARDY Son Male 14 Bottesford, Leicester, England Coal Miner
John WOOLLY Brother In Law M Male 51 Clifton, Nottingham, England Ag Lab
Arthur WOOLLY Step Son Male 16 Clifton, Nottingham, England Ag Lab

1901 Census Extract: Shipley, Derbys
Joseph Hardy Male 57 1844 Foreman Gas Works Leicester Bottesford
Harriet Hardy Female 62 1839 Notts Clifton

Also son John nearby:
John Hardy Male 34 1867 Gas Stoker Leicester Bottesford
Ada Hardy Female 32 1869 Notts Clifton
John Hardy Male 6 1895 Derbys Shipley

Also John Woolley in Clifton:
John Woolley Male 72 1829 Road Man To District Councel Nottingham Clifton
Lilia Woolley Female 69 1832 Leicester Long Whatton

Also found on 1901 Census Extract: (same page as John Hallam)
William Woolley Head 36 Coalminer, Loader born Clifton Nottingham
with wife Sarah A and 5 Children
ANY LINKS?? 
HARDY Joseph
 
208 Constant companion of Grandma Wilson (HARRIS Elsie Hannah) HARRIS Edith
 
209 [Hallam 18 Jan 02.GED]

Lived in:
13, Hardwick Crescent, Manton, Worksop.
468, Aspley lane, Aspley, Nottm. 1953 to '66. 
HARRIS Elsie Hannah
 
210 1871 census for Tupton
3 Rose Terrace -Joseph Harris Head-----Mar-----46----CoalMiner-----Salap. Abby Forest
Mary A Harris Wife-----Mar-------35------------------------Ditto. Brosley
Mary J Harris Daur ---------------12------Scholar-------Staffordshire--Mosley Hole
Betsy Harris Daur ----------------8--------Dito ----------Ditto. Willenhall
Robert Harris Son------------------3---------Dito ----------Ditto. Potteries
Richard Harris Son -----------------6 months--------------Derbyshire. Tupton

Source Information: 1881
Dwelling 506 Clay Cross Blocks Census Place Shirland, Derby, England
Family History Library Film 1341820
PRO Ref: RG11 Piece / Folio 3429 / 55 Page Number 21

Name Relation Marital Status Gender Age Birthplace Occupation Disability
Joseph HARRIS Head M Male 38 Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England Coal Miner
Mary A. HARRIS Wife M Female 44 Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England
Robert HARRIS Son U Male 17 Stoke, Stafford, England Coal Miner
Richard HARRIS Son U Male 11 N Tupton, Derby, England Scholar
Ellen HARRIS Daur U Female 8 Clay Cross, Derby, England Scholar
Joseph HARRIS Son U Male 6 Clay Cross, Derby, England Scholar

1891 Census at South St, South Normanton: 
HARRIS Joseph
 
211 [Hallam 18 Jan 02.GED]
http://www.southnormanton.com/churches.html & http://www.southnormanton.com/
He is buried with his wife, in South Normanton, Derbyshire, England. 
HARRIS Robert
 
212 born Margarita Cansino

http://www.geocities.com/classicmoviestar/rita.html 
HAYWORTH Rita
 
213 ?? ELIZABETH HENSHAW
Christening: 31 MAR 1872 Cotmanhay, Derby, England
Parents:
Father: JOHN HENSHAW
Mother: SARAH
5/11/03 Found link to a site http://www.rawbw.com/~hinshaw/cgi-bin/id?2181 
HENSHAW Elizabeth
 
214 1881 Census: RG11 Piece / Folio 3342 / 52 Page Number 26 Family History Library Film 1341797
Dwelling 16 Fairfield Street
Census Place Radford, Nottingham, England
Name Relation Marital Gender Age Birthplace Occupation
Mary HINGLEY Head W Female 62 Warrington
Mary A. HINGLEY Daur U Female 32 Duffield Hose Mender
George H. HINGLEY Nephew Male 10 Sneinton, Nottingham, Scholar  
HINGLEY Joseph
 
215 [Hollingg.ged]

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
HOGLUND Anna Elizabeth
 
216 [Hollingg.ged]

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
HOGLUND Anna Elizabeth
 
217 [Hollingg.ged]

!Baptized by Elder J. William Jardive, Portland, Ore.
Confirmed Feb 4 1906 by Elder James C. Westergard.
Ordained Deacon Feb 12, 1911 by Elder James C. Westergard, Portland Ore.

Was a Mason. 
HOLLING Claudius Toone
 
218 [Hollingg.ged]

!Baptized by Elder J. William Jardive, Portland, Ore.
Confirmed Feb 4 1906 by Elder James C. Westergard.
Ordained Deacon Feb 12, 1911 by Elder James C. Westergard, Portland Ore.

Was a Mason. 
HOLLING Claudius Toone
 
219 [Hollingg.ged]

XIMENA NEVER MARRIED.
Baptized by Elder Joseph Christenson SLC.

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
HOLLING Emma Ximena
 
220 [Hollingg.ged]

XIMENA NEVER MARRIED.
Baptized by Elder Joseph Christenson SLC.

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
HOLLING Emma Ximena
 
221 [Hollingg.ged]

Source: Notes by Marcus W. Holling - "I have a German Luthern prayer book belonging to Marcus Holling with no dates or notes except his name on a fly leaf. He was fluent in seven different languages and was a professor of mathematics. He crossed the plains in a hand cart company with a tall silk hat and a swallow tail coat. Must have come from the landed gentry of Germany or Denmark. Reported that he was educated in Oxford University, England.

Baptised Salt Lake City 1 December 1864 by John Sharp. Held office of Seventy in the 36th Quorum. Reported a secretary to Brigham Young. Set apart for a Mission to Holland 21 April 1867 by George Q. Cannon."

Married June 19, 1865 Endowment hOuse by Heber C. Kimball.

Marcus Holling
Priesthood Line of Authority

Marcus Holling
set apart as president of the Netherlands Mission on April 21, 1867
under the hands of

George Quayle Cannon
who was ordained an Apostle
on August 26, 1880
under the hands of

Brigham Young
who was ordained an Apostle
on February 14, 1835
under the hands of

Oliver Cowder, Martin Harris, and David Whittmer
(The Three Witnesses)
who received the Melchizedek Priesthood
in May of 1829
under the hands of

Joseph Smith, Junior
who received the Melchizedek Priesthood
in May of 1829
under the hands of

Peter, James, and John
who were ordained Apostles
under the hands of

Jesus Christ


Taken from the book " Ancestry and Genealogy of Thomas Grover"
Mentions Marcus Holling as part of this Missionary Group.

"He started from Alt Lake City on this mission, on 12 May 1867, crossing the plains most of the way by foot, and occasionally by oxteam. His own immediate group of missionaries were: Nephi Pratt, John S. Lewis, Levi W. Richards, Willard B. Richards, and himself, the other missionaries in the large party, most of whom were going to Europe, were: Karl G. Maeser, M. Holling, Octave Ursenbach, James Sharp, Wm. H. Harner, Christian Fjeldsted, , (???) Mortensen, (???) Olson, (???) Reese, (???) Jensen, (???) Peterson, and (???) Johnson. Due to the deep snows in the canyons, and snow and mud in the high valleys of the Rockies in eastern Utah and Wyoming, even at this late period o spring, their travel was quite slow, many days making only ten or twelve miles, while on better days they sometimes made as much as twenty five or even thirty miles each day. The weather was fine for the most part, his record states , though they had a few small storms and considerable wind, but most nights were quite cold at that high altitude and in the open country. He and the others soon learned at first hand just what their parents and the other pioneers had encountered fifteen to twenty years before. The night of Firday , June 7th, while camped on the "Muddy Creek", (evidently just southeast of Wamsutter, Wyoming), Indians attacked their camp, killing the herdsman and night-guard, a Brother Christian Jensen, and made off with the four horses they had. After burying Brother Jensen, they proceeded slowly onward being more careful, and doubling the night-guard over teh oxen. Tavel from there on was by foot for all of them, with only occasional travel in the wagons when the going was easier. Their oxen became poisoned from eating certain weeds along the trail, and they lost a very ffew of the cattle, doctoring the sick with emetics, and then loading the sick cattle into one or two of the large wagons, and proceeding on their way. The sick oxen soon recovered, and they lost very few, while other parties of ox-trains were loosing many of their best cattle due to the poisoning from bad feed along the trail. Monday, July1, 1867, they arrived at Julesburg, Colorado, which was then the western terminus of the Union Pacific Railroad, then being pushed westward across the courntry as radily as possible. From Julesburg to Omaha City, then from Council Bluffs to Chicago, and onto New York City they traveled by "the luxurious comfort of an elegant railway carriage", changing cars and trains three or four times en-route, as they changed from one railroad to the other, reaching their destination, New York City, on Saturday, July 6th, where they took in the sights of the big City for a few days, though he acknowledges they "all soon tired of such a City lif". Wile in New York City they met Brothers Orson Pratt, Brigham Young JR., Mrs Young, John W. Young, Geo D. Watt, and others , who were en-route home to Salt Lake City, after ahving just returned from England. Friday, July 12, Brother Maeser procured their tickets for passage to England on the SS. Manhattan, sailing the next day. The following several days of grandfather's Journal states how terribly sick he was, learning all about sea-sickness and steerage life, and became convinced he was very poor material for a sailors life. Friday, July 26, 1867, they landed 'on good old terra firma" in Liverpool, England and were met by Brothers Franklin D. Richards, W. B. Preston, and C. W. Penrose. "....... 
HOLLING Marcus
 
222 [Hollingg.ged]

Source: Notes by Marcus W. Holling - "I have a German Luthern prayer book belonging to Marcus Holling with no dates or notes except his name on a fly leaf. He was fluent in seven different languages and was a professor of mathematics. He crossed the plains in a hand cart company with a tall silk hat and a swallow tail coat. Must have come from the landed gentry of Germany or Denmark. Reported that he was educated in Oxford University, England.

Baptised Salt Lake City 1 December 1864 by John Sharp. Held office of Seventy in the 36th Quorum. Reported a secretary to Brigham Young. Set apart for a Mission to Holland 21 April 1867 by George Q. Cannon."

Married June 19, 1865 Endowment hOuse by Heber C. Kimball.

Marcus Holling
Priesthood Line of Authority

Marcus Holling
set apart as president of the Netherlands Mission on April 21, 1867
under the hands of

George Quayle Cannon
who was ordained an Apostle
on August 26, 1880
under the hands of

Brigham Young
who was ordained an Apostle
on February 14, 1835
under the hands of

Oliver Cowder, Martin Harris, and David Whittmer
(The Three Witnesses)
who received the Melchizedek Priesthood
in May of 1829
under the hands of

Joseph Smith, Junior
who received the Melchizedek Priesthood
in May of 1829
under the hands of

Peter, James, and John
who were ordained Apostles
under the hands of

Jesus Christ


Taken from the book " Ancestry and Genealogy of Thomas Grover"
Mentions Marcus Holling as part of this Missionary Group.

"He started from Alt Lake City on this mission, on 12 May 1867, crossing the plains most of the way by foot, and occasionally by oxteam. His own immediate group of missionaries were: Nephi Pratt, John S. Lewis, Levi W. Richards, Willard B. Richards, and himself, the other missionaries in the large party, most of whom were going to Europe, were: Karl G. Maeser, M. Holling, Octave Ursenbach, James Sharp, Wm. H. Harner, Christian Fjeldsted, , (???) Mortensen, (???) Olson, (???) Reese, (???) Jensen, (???) Peterson, and (???) Johnson. Due to the deep snows in the canyons, and snow and mud in the high valleys of the Rockies in eastern Utah and Wyoming, even at this late period o spring, their travel was quite slow, many days making only ten or twelve miles, while on better days they sometimes made as much as twenty five or even thirty miles each day. The weather was fine for the most part, his record states , though they had a few small storms and considerable wind, but most nights were quite cold at that high altitude and in the open country. He and the others soon learned at first hand just what their parents and the other pioneers had encountered fifteen to twenty years before. The night of Firday , June 7th, while camped on the "Muddy Creek", (evidently just southeast of Wamsutter, Wyoming), Indians attacked their camp, killing the herdsman and night-guard, a Brother Christian Jensen, and made off with the four horses they had. After burying Brother Jensen, they proceeded slowly onward being more careful, and doubling the night-guard over teh oxen. Tavel from there on was by foot for all of them, with only occasional travel in the wagons when the going was easier. Their oxen became poisoned from eating certain weeds along the trail, and they lost a very ffew of the cattle, doctoring the sick with emetics, and then loading the sick cattle into one or two of the large wagons, and proceeding on their way. The sick oxen soon recovered, and they lost very few, while other parties of ox-trains were loosing many of their best cattle due to the poisoning from bad feed along the trail. Monday, July1, 1867, they arrived at Julesburg, Colorado, which was then the western terminus of the Union Pacific Railroad, then being pushed westward across the courntry as radily as possible. From Julesburg to Omaha City, then from Council Bluffs to Chicago, and onto New York City they traveled by "the luxurious comfort of an elegant railway carriage", changing cars and trains three or four times en-route, as they changed from one railroad to the other, reaching their destination, New York City, on Saturday, July 6th, where they took in the sights of the big City for a few days, though he acknowledges they "all soon tired of such a City lif". Wile in New York City they met Brothers Orson Pratt, Brigham Young JR., Mrs Young, John W. Young, Geo D. Watt, and others , who were en-route home to Salt Lake City, after ahving just returned from England. Friday, July 12, Brother Maeser procured their tickets for passage to England on the SS. Manhattan, sailing the next day. The following several days of grandfather's Journal states how terribly sick he was, learning all about sea-sickness and steerage life, and became convinced he was very poor material for a sailors life. Friday, July 26, 1867, they landed 'on good old terra firma" in Liverpool, England and were met by Brothers Franklin D. Richards, W. B. Preston, and C. W. Penrose. "....... 
HOLLING Marcus
 
223 [Hollingg.ged]

!Marcus William Holling is buried in Portland Oregon at the Willamette National Cemetary.
Marcus was baptized by Elder L.P. Overson Jr.,Portland Ore. in the Willamette River. Confirmed by his father, Marcus W.F.Holling Ordained Deacon, 27 March 1903 by father.
Ordained Priest, 19 Oct 1913 by Elder H.P. Mathews. 
HOLLING Marcus William
 
224 [Hollingg.ged]

!Marcus William Holling is buried in Portland Oregon at the Willamette National Cemetary.
Marcus was baptized by Elder L.P. Overson Jr.,Portland Ore. in the Willamette River. Confirmed by his father, Marcus W.F.Holling Ordained Deacon, 27 March 1903 by father.
Ordained Priest, 19 Oct 1913 by Elder H.P. Mathews. 
HOLLING Marcus William
 
225 [Hollingg.ged]

(Taken from Funeral notes for Marcus William Frisby Holling)

MARCUS WILLIAM FRISBY HOLLING

Born: 8 April 1866, Great Salt Lake City, Territory of Utah Father: Marcus Holling, born Meldorf, Denmark
Mother: Emily Frisby
Died: 5 march 1949, 2:40 pm Multnomah Old Peoples Home, Gresham Oregon Age: 82 years, 10 months, and 27 days
Burial: Rose City Cemetery, Wednesday 9 March 1949 at 3:00 pm Family plot
( North end, Marcus William Holling, next to south, mother Sarah Emma
Toone Holling, next south, Emma Ximena Holling) Next grave to south,
Grave #1, East 1/2 lot #106 section "H" purchased March 10, 1949 for
burial of Claudius Toone Holling son who is now in bad physical
condition. A.J.Rose and Son morticians. Floyd Batman body preparation and ect.

Married: Sarah Emma Toone, in Logan Temple 22 October 1889 Children: Emma Ximena Holling (died spinster 1938)
Marcus William Holling born 1893
Elsie Lavaughn Holling born 1895
Claudius Toone Holling born 1897
Melvin G. Holling born 1904

Ordained Elder, 1 September 1889 by George Timpson. High Priest, 28 December
1942 by Lewis A. West

Funeral Service: Bishop Thomas Y. Emmet conducting, Jens C. Westergard invocation, Janice Hargraves and Norma Rust Soloist, Nelle Clark Organist, Patriarch William R. Sloan Speaker, President Jay W. Lundy Closing Prayer, Elder William Dyer Grave side dedication, Conrad Green, Jessie B. Purdy, Harry Phillips, J.C. Westergard, Jay W. Lundy, Lewis A. West Pall Bearers.

Death: Suffered a stroke paralyzing right side wednesday 23 February 1949. unable to recognize or speak. Thursday march 3 went into a deep coma and passed away Saturday 5 March 1949 at 2:40 pm.

Started School "Social Hall" run by Mary and Ida Cook. Went to work in a shoe factory. Worked as a cash boy in Z.C.M.I. Deseret News as press feeder and bindry. Utah Central Rail Road as painter apprentice. Job painting in Great Salt Lke City, fireman and pump engineer Ontario Mine Park City. Machinist apprentice D.R. and G.R.R. and cooperative Iron Works. Studied under Karl G. Measer at B.Y.U. and worked as machinist at Provo Foundry. Worked at Silver Brothers machinists at Salt Lake City. Linotype machinist at the Hearld and went to Linotype School at L8inotype Scool in New York City. Returned to Hearld to maintain 8 modle i Linotypes and general plant upkeep.

Came to the Oregonian newpaper in Portland Oregon 1900 for supt. C.A. Morden. Had a bad head injury in 1905 which troubled him for several years. Joined with al. Cochran in a mechanical and electrical contracting firm, later returning to the Oregonian. Mother died 9 May 1921 in Portland. Father and Ximena toured Utah following the death of mother and returned home sick and confined to bed several months during winter 1922. Went to Dr. Work for treatment and returned to the Oregonian Newspaper spring of 1924. 
HOLLING Marcus William FRISBY
 
226 [Hollingg.ged]

(Taken from Funeral notes for Marcus William Frisby Holling)

MARCUS WILLIAM FRISBY HOLLING

Born: 8 April 1866, Great Salt Lake City, Territory of Utah Father: Marcus Holling, born Meldorf, Denmark
Mother: Emily Frisby
Died: 5 march 1949, 2:40 pm Multnomah Old Peoples Home, Gresham Oregon Age: 82 years, 10 months, and 27 days
Burial: Rose City Cemetery, Wednesday 9 March 1949 at 3:00 pm Family plot
( North end, Marcus William Holling, next to south, mother Sarah Emma
Toone Holling, next south, Emma Ximena Holling) Next grave to south,
Grave #1, East 1/2 lot #106 section "H" purchased March 10, 1949 for
burial of Claudius Toone Holling son who is now in bad physical
condition. A.J.Rose and Son morticians. Floyd Batman body preparation and ect.

Married: Sarah Emma Toone, in Logan Temple 22 October 1889 Children: Emma Ximena Holling (died spinster 1938)
Marcus William Holling born 1893
Elsie Lavaughn Holling born 1895
Claudius Toone Holling born 1897
Melvin G. Holling born 1904

Ordained Elder, 1 September 1889 by George Timpson. High Priest, 28 December
1942 by Lewis A. West

Funeral Service: Bishop Thomas Y. Emmet conducting, Jens C. Westergard invocation, Janice Hargraves and Norma Rust Soloist, Nelle Clark Organist, Patriarch William R. Sloan Speaker, President Jay W. Lundy Closing Prayer, Elder William Dyer Grave side dedication, Conrad Green, Jessie B. Purdy, Harry Phillips, J.C. Westergard, Jay W. Lundy, Lewis A. West Pall Bearers.

Death: Suffered a stroke paralyzing right side wednesday 23 February 1949. unable to recognize or speak. Thursday march 3 went into a deep coma and passed away Saturday 5 March 1949 at 2:40 pm.

Started School "Social Hall" run by Mary and Ida Cook. Went to work in a shoe factory. Worked as a cash boy in Z.C.M.I. Deseret News as press feeder and bindry. Utah Central Rail Road as painter apprentice. Job painting in Great Salt Lke City, fireman and pump engineer Ontario Mine Park City. Machinist apprentice D.R. and G.R.R. and cooperative Iron Works. Studied under Karl G. Measer at B.Y.U. and worked as machinist at Provo Foundry. Worked at Silver Brothers machinists at Salt Lake City. Linotype machinist at the Hearld and went to Linotype School at L8inotype Scool in New York City. Returned to Hearld to maintain 8 modle i Linotypes and general plant upkeep.

Came to the Oregonian newpaper in Portland Oregon 1900 for supt. C.A. Morden. Had a bad head injury in 1905 which troubled him for several years. Joined with al. Cochran in a mechanical and electrical contracting firm, later returning to the Oregonian. Mother died 9 May 1921 in Portland. Father and Ximena toured Utah following the death of mother and returned home sick and confined to bed several months during winter 1922. Went to Dr. Work for treatment and returned to the Oregonian Newspaper spring of 1924. 
HOLLING Marcus William FRISBY
 
227 [Hollingg.ged]

Ancestral File cannot share event information because this person is "living".

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
HOLLING Melvin Golden
 
228 [Hollingg.ged]

Ancestral File cannot share event information because this person is "living".

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
HOLLING Melvin Golden
 
229 [Hollingg.ged]

Source: Notes from Marcus W. Holling stating that Paul William Holling and Anna Laackmann had 2 sons. The oldest was Marcus Holling and the younger was Paul Holling. He states that it is reported that Paul Holling died in infancy being strangled with a potato in his mouth. 
HOLLING Paul
 
230 [Hollingg.ged]

Source: Notes from Marcus W. Holling stating that Paul William Holling and Anna Laackmann had 2 sons. The oldest was Marcus Holling and the younger was Paul Holling. He states that it is reported that Paul Holling died in infancy being strangled with a potato in his mouth. 
HOLLING Paul
 
231 A Hapsburg ruler who failed

EMPEROR MAXIMILIAN II
By Paula Sutter Fichtner
Yale University Press, $30, 344 pages, illus.
REVIEWED BY BRIDGET HEAL

"By virtually all standards, including his own, Emperor Maximilian II (1527-1576) was a failure." So begins Paula Sutter Fichtner's account of the life and times of one of 16th-century Europe's least effective rulers.

As a Hapsburg, Maximilian was a member of one of Europe's leading dynasties. His uncle, Charles V, had built up a massive empire, uniting the Netherlands, Spain, the New World, Naples, Sicily and Germany under his leadership. Charles' son, Philip, inherited the Spanish part of this empire and the Netherlands, while Germany passed to Charles' brother, Ferdinand, and thence, in 1562, to Ferdinand's son, Maximilian.

Charles V and Philip II are two of the great figures of European history and have been the subjects of numerous studies, but "Emperor Maximillian II" is the first full biography of Maximilian II in English. Perhaps not surprisingly, previous scholars have been deterred by Maximilian's inadequacies — his inability to achieve any of his stated aims and his failure to make any lasting impression on Europe's political and religious landscape. As the author points out, however, history is not just about great achievements. It is about the totality of past experience, in which failure and defeat have inevitably played a central role. 
HOLY ROMAN EMPIRE Maximilian II Emperor Of The
 
232 [Hollingg.ged]

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
HURST Elizabeth
 
233 [Hollingg.ged]

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
HURST Elizabeth
 
234 [Hollingg.ged]

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
HURST John
 
235 [Hollingg.ged]

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
HURST John
 
236 Having followed the various threads on this subject, is the following correct?

Llywellyn Fawr (1194-1240)
Married [1] Joan Plantagenet (c 1189-1236)

Children:

Gwladus Ddu (1206-1251) m[1] Reginald de Braose
m[2] Ralph Mortimer
Margaret m[1] John de Braose
m[2] Walter de Clifford
Angharad
Dafydd (1208-1246) m Isabel de Braose
Susanna
Ellen (Helen) m[1] Malcolm, Earl of Fife
m[2] Donald

Married [2] Gwenllian of Brynffenigi

Children:

Helen m[1] John le Scot
m[2] Robert de Quincey
Gwenllian

Mistress: Tangwystl ferch Llywarch Goch

Child: Gruffydd (1196-1244)

Graeme Wall

My genealogy website:
http://www.greywall.demon.co.uk/genealogy/index.html


Dave Utzinger posted on this based on the an article by William Addams
Reitwiesner in The Genealogist, vol. 1, no. 1 (Spring 1980), pp. 80-95. This
is his list:

Descendants of Llywelyn ap Iorworth

1 Llywelyn ap Iorworth b: Abt. 1173 in Dolyddelan, Wales d: 11 April
1240 in Aberconway Abbey, Carnarvonshire, Wales
. +Tangwystl verch Llwarch b: Abt. 1168 in of Rhos, Wales d: Bef. 1205
2 Gruffudd ap Llewellyn b: Bef. 1205 d: 01 March 1243/44 in London,
ENG
. +Senena ferch Caradog
*2nd Wife of Gruffudd ap Llewellyn:
. +Rhanullt
*2nd Wife of Llywelyn ap Iorworth:
. +Joan Plantagenet b: Abt. 1191 d: 02 February 1236/37 in Aber
Palace, Carnarvon, Wales
2 Elen verch Llywelyn b: in Gwynedd, Wales d: Bef. 24 October
1253
. +John of Scotland b: 1207 m: 1222 d: Abt. 06 June 1237
*2nd Husband of Elen verch Llywelyn:
. +Robert de Quincey b: Abt. 1176 m: Aft. 06 June 1237 d: Abt. 1257
2 Dafydd ap Llywelyn b: Abt. 1208 d: 12 February 1245/46 in Aber
. +Concubine
*2nd Wife of Dafydd ap Llywelyn:
. +Isabel de Braose b: Abt. 1215 m: Abt. 10 August 1230 d: Bef. 1248
*3rd Wife of Llywelyn ap Iorworth:
. +Unknown
2 Gwenllian of Wales d: 1281
. +William de Lacy
2 Angharad verch Llewelyn
. +Maelgwn Fychan d: 1257
2 Tegwared y Baiswen
. +Gwenllian ferch Ednyfed ap Cynwrig
2 Angharad verch Llywelyn
. +Philip ap Ivor
2 Daughter verch Llywelyn
. +William Caentwn
2 Gwladys Dhu of Wales b: Abt. 1194 in of Gwynedd, Wales d: 1251 in
Windsor, BRK, ENG
. +Reginald de Braose b: Abt. 1171 in Bramber, SSX, ENG m: 1215
d: Bet. 05 May 1227 - 09 June 1228 in Brecon, Breconshire, Wales
*2nd Husband of Gwladys Dhu of Wales:
. +Ralph de Mortimer b: 1190 in of Wigmore, HEF, ENG m: 1230 d: 06
August 1246 in Wigmore, HRT, ENG
2 Margred verch Llewellyn b: Abt. 1208 in Wales (North) d: 1268
. +John de Breuse b: Abt. 1198 m: Abt. 1220 d: Abt. 02 November
1232 in Bramber, SUS, ENG
*2nd Husband of Margred verch Llewellyn:
. +Walter III de Clifford b: Abt. 1186 in ENG m: Abt. 1232 in SSX, ENG

d: Abt. 23 December 1263 in Clifford
2 Helen verch Llewellyn b: Abt. 1234 in of Wales
. +Malcolm MacDuff b: Bef. 1228 d: 1266
*2nd Husband of Helen verch Llewellyn:
. +Donald de Mar d: Aft. 25 July 1297 
IORWERTH Llewelyn Ap, Llewelyn the Great
 
237 [Hollingg.ged]

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996.

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
JACKLIN Sarah Lucy
 
238 [Hollingg.ged]

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996.

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
JACKLIN Sarah Lucy
 
239 [Hollingg.ged]

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
JACKSON John
 
240 [Hollingg.ged]

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
JACKSON John
 
241 [Hollingg.ged]

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
JACKSON Martha
 
242 [Hollingg.ged]

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
JACKSON Martha
 
243 HM QE II is my (distant) cousin. My Jennings family was kicked out of the English Royal Family and out of England early 1800's by a child king - and came to the US, ie., Ashtabula, Ohio. We are the Jennings family listed in various royal family trees. A book and a movie were made about us (and others) around the 1960's - these are currently unavailable. A lot of official records about us have been destroyed, inorder to keep the crown were it is. We were members of the royal family for over five hundred years. Thanks for your interest, davidajennings@citynet.net JENNINGS Sarah
 
244 [Hollingg.ged]

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
JOHNSTON Amy Lovisa
 
245 [Hollingg.ged]

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
JOHNSTON Amy Lovisa
 
246 Here's how John van der Kiste tells it:
“During the night of 1 July 1694, Königsmarck was seen to enter the Leineschloss Palace and go to
Sophia Dorothea’s apartments. He never came out alive. What precisely happened that night will
probably never be known, but the traditional version has it that he received a note in pencil left
on a table in the sitting-room of his house in Hanover that afternoon, informing him that he was
summoned to meet Princess Sophia Dorotha in her private apartment at about 10 o’clock that night.
The note purported to be hers but was in fact the work of Countess von Platen. That he did not
suspect it was a trap designed to lure him could be put down to his ignorance of how much his and
the Princess’s indiscretions had become the subject of gossip at court during his absence.
Disguising himself in shabby clothes, he gave a prearranged signal under the window of her
apartment, and she let him in. It was the first time she had seen him for three months, and she told
him that the note was a forgery. He told her that a carriage was ready to take them to safety at
Wolfenbüttel, and she would have agreed to join him at once if it was not for the matter of saying
goodbye to her children. She would do so next morning, and asked him to return with his carriage at
the same time on the evening of 2 July. Nearby Countess von Platen and her courtiers were lying in
wait. Her spies had kept her informed of the intended flight, and as soon as Königsmarck had
arrived, she went to the Elector’s chamber to inform him. With the assistance of four halberdiers,
she said, she could catch the young lovers red-handed. To the scheme of capturing and arresting
them, he gave his approval, and she hid the men in a chimney recess, locked all the doors out of the
Princess’s gallery except one near the chimney, and hid behind a curtain. When Königsmarck tried to
leave and found his way blocked, he realized what had happened. Outnumbered by four to one he had no
chance, but with the sword which he always carried he wounded three of them. However, they
overpowered him and stabbed him to death, and as he lay dying the Countess, who had been watching
with malicious glee, came and kicked him viciously in the mouth. Having witnessed his despatch, she
realized with dismay that the Elector had merely authorized her to bring the Count to justice, and
she returned to his apartment panic-stricken. Though angry with her he knew that he was also
implicated in the murder, and he authorized her to do what she could to suppress any trace of the
night’s events. The halberiers were ordered to throw the body in the palace latrines, cover it with
quicklime and brick the wall up. They accomplished their mission silently and by dawn they were all
in their beds.” An alternative reconstruction has the body placed in a sack, weighted with stones,
and thrown into the river.

About 1/2 of the correspondance between Philip and Sophia survives today, having been sent to his
sister Aurora, who preserved it.

The European Royal History Journal, Issue XV, February 2000, p. 9.
van der Kiste, John, The Georgian Princesses, Sutton Publishing, Gloucestershire, England, 2000, p. 23. 
KÖNIGSMARK Philipp Christoff von
 
247 Name Suffix: Prince
http://ismaili.net/histoire/history08/history836.html 
KHAN Prince Aly Aga
 
248 N. de Baumgarten in his "Genealogies et Mariages Occidentaux des Rurikides Russes du Xe au XIIIe siecle" (Roma, 1927) states on pp. 22-26 the details of the descendants of Great Prince Vsevolod I including Euphrosine. He lists her as the eldest child of Mstislav-Harald's second marriage in 1122 to the daughter of Dimitri Zawiditch, possadnik of Novgorod, which daughter died after 1168.

Some further details concerning this marriage can be found in Vol. XXV of the Camden Society's 3rd Series of publications, namely: "The Chronicle of Novgorod, 1016-1471" translated & edited by Robert Michell & Nevill Forbes (London, 1914). It is written that Mstislav married the still unnamed daughter sometime during 1122 in Kiev and that her father, Dmitri Zavidits, posadnik of Novgorod, had died July 9, 1118 (p. 10).

I suppose Dmitri Zavidich was probably either of Slavic or Scandinavian origin. Presumably he come from a family of Boyars in Novgorod as he was a Posadnik of that city.

Sincerely,
Kelsey J. Williams 
KIEV Mstislav I Grand Duke Of
 
249 1901 Census: RG13 3151
8 Taylor Street, Ilkeston
Frederick J Kirk Head 24 Framework Knitter Hosiery Derbys Ilkeston
Annie Wife 24 Leics Shepshed
Redvers J Son 1 Derbys Ilkeston
Annie Daur 1 Mth Derbys Ilkeston  
KIRK Frederick
 
250 Found this on LDS:

Alfred KNIGHTON
Sex: M

Event(s):
Christening: 9 Jan 1840
Pinxton, Derby, England

Parents:
Father: Robert KNIGHTON
Mother: Georgiana

Source Information:
Batch number: Dates Source Call No. Type Printout Call No. Type
C059681 1773-1812 0428933 Film 6900889 Film
C059681 1813-1868 0498115 Film NONE
Sheet:
Census 1881:Public Records Office Reference RG11 Piece / Folio 3325 / 36 Page Number 11
Dwelling Shipley Road Cottage
Census Place Shipley, Derby, England
Family History Library Film 1341793
Name Relation Marital Status Gender Age Birthplace Occupation Disability
Fredk. KNIGHTON Head M Male 55 Ilkeston, Derby, England Painter & Plumber
Emma KNIGHTON Wife M Female 52 Ilkeston, Derby, England
Josh. KNIGHTON Son U Male 24 Ilkeston, Derby, England Coal Miner
Douglas KNIGHTON Son U Male 20 Ilkeston, Derby, England Coal Miner
Hannah KNIGHTON Daugr U Female 14 Ilkeston, Derby, England Scholar
Matilda KNIGHTON Daugr U Female 9 Ilkeston, Derby, England Scholar


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source Information:
Dwelling Shipley Road Cottage
Census Place Shipley, Derby, England
Family History Library Film 1341793
 
KNIGHTON Alfred
 

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