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101 [Hollingg.ged]

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
ELSOM Joseph
 
102 [Hollingg.ged]

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
ELSOM Joseph
 
103 Catherine of Aragon was a Spanish princess (her badge shows a pomegranate - a symbol from Spain).
She was the daughter of King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain, and was originally married to
Henry's brother Arthur. Henry married Catherine to maintain the alliance with Spain after Arthur died,
leaving Catherine a widow. This marriage was organized by Henry VII a short time before he died, but
took place after his death in 1509, when Henry was almost 18 and Catherine was 23.

After twenty years of marriage, she had only given birth to one girl, Mary, later
to become known as Bloody Mary (although she had many miscarriages and
still-births in that time). As Henry VIII needed a son to provide a male heir to the throne, and as
his advisors deemed Catherine to be past the age of child-birth, Henry tried to persuade her to
become a Nun. Catherine refused, and after two years of arguments with the Pope, Henry
created a new Archbishop (Thomas Cranmer) who was prepared to declare the marriage
annulled in 1532. Catherine was then banished from the Court and separated from her daughter.
It is said that she died of a broken heart, four years later.

http://www.larmouth.demon.co.uk/sarah-jayne/wives/wives.html 
ENGLAND Catalina (Catherine) Queen Of, Catherine of Aragon
 
104 "The Kings of Scotland", which appeared in volume I [1904] of *The Scots Peerage*, edited by Sir James Balfour Paul, states on pp. 29-30:

CHARLES 11. was born 29 May 1630, succeeded his father on 30 January 1648-49, but the kingdom being then in the hands of the 'Republicans' under Oliver Cromwell, who governed with the title of Protector, his early years were spent in exile. The Scottish Presbyterians distrusting Cromwell and the English Independents, had invited Charles to assume the Crown of Scotland, and though their army was defeated by Cromwell at Dunbar, 3 September 1650, he was duly crowned King of Scots at Scone I January 1650-51. Invading England, however, his army was defeated by Cromwell at Worcester on 3 September 1631, and the Young king had to seek safety abroad.

Soon After the death of Cromwell, Charles was restored to his kingdom, and entered London on his thirtieth birthday, 29 MAY 1660. He married, 31 May 1662, Donna Catherine Infanta of Portugal, born 25 November 1638, daughter of John iv., King of Portugal, sister of Alphonso vi and Pedro ii., successively kings of Portugal. King Charles died 6 February 1685 leaving no issue by his queen, who retired to Lisbon, where she died 31 December 1705. He had, however, many illegitimate children 
ENGLAND Charles II King Of
 
105 From: royalancestry@msn.com (Douglas Richardson)

A few days ago, I posted a list of the known illegitimate children of
Edward IV, King of England (died 1483). Since posting, I've been
contacted by two newsgroup members each of whom has added a new
potential illegitimate child of King Edward IV. On my own, I've found
additional sources for two of the previously identified illegitimate
children. I've also found a reference to yet another alleged
illegitimate daughter in a late visitation who reputedly married into
the Musgrave family. I haven't included that child in the list below,
as I haven't yet confirmed that such a child and marriage occurred.

If anyone has anything to add to the information below or possesses
any information on a possible illegitimate daughter who married a
Musgrave, please post that information here on the newsgroup or
contact me at my e-mail address below.

Many thanks to Peter Sutton and James Trabue for sharing their
information with me.

Best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah

E-mail: royalancestry@msn.com

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
List of Illegitimate Children of King Edward IV

Illegitimate child of Edward IV of England, by an unknown mistress,
possibly Elizabeth Lucy:

i. ELIZABETH PLANTAGENET, married before 1477 THOMAS LUMLEY, Knt., son
and heir apparent of George Lumley, Knt., Lord Lumley, by Elizabeth,
daughter and heiress of Roger Thornton, Esq. They had four sons,
Richard [Lord Lumley], John, George, and Roger, Esq., and three
daughters, Anne (wife of Robert Ogle, 4th Lord Ogle), Sibyl (wife of
William Hilton, Knt., de jure 9th Lord Hylton), and Elizabeth (wife of
Robert Cresswell, Esq.). SIR THOMAS LUMLEY was living 27 Oct. 1495,
and died prior to 1507. Descendants (not traced). [Note: Additional
evidence of Elizabeth's parentage may be seen in the papal
dispensation granted in 1489 for Elizabeth's son, Richard Lumley, to
marry Anne Conyers, they being related in the [3rd and] 4th degree of
kindred. A dispensation was needed for this marriage, as the two
parties were both descended from Ralph Neville, K.G., 1st Earl of
Westmorland, and his wife, Joan Beaufort (see Testamenta Eboracensia 3
(Surtees Soc., vol. 45) (1865): 355)]. Collins-Brydges, Peerage of
England 3 (1812): 703 (citing MS. E. 6, f. 5, b. in Offic. Arm.). R.
Surtees, Hist. & Antiq. of the County Palatine of Durham 2 (1820): 139
(Lumley monument in Chester-le-Street, co. Durham church: " ... inde
pater efficitur illius Thomae qui ex magni Regis Edovardi quarti filia
naturali, Richardum susceperat ..."), 140 (monumental inscription at
Chester-le-Street: "Sir Thomas Lumley, Knight, sonne of George Lord
Lumley, maried Elizabeth, daughter naturel to Kinge Edwarde the
fourth, and he died in the life of his father, and had issue Richard
Lord Lumley") (Elizabeth's arms: 1. France and England; 2. a plain
cross of Ulster; 3. as 2; 4. barry of six, on a chief three pallets,
between two esquires' bastions, dexter and sinister, an inescutcheon
Argent, Mortimer, over all a bar sinister), 162-164 (Lumley chart).
Surtees Soc. 41 (1862): 27 (1530 Vis. Durham) (Lumley pedigree:
"Thomas Lumley, son and heyre to George, maried Elisabeth, bastard
doughter to Kyng Edward the iiijth"). R. Surtees, Hist. & Antiq. of
the County Palatine of Durham 2 (1820): 163-164. H.S.P. 16 (1881):
189-190 (1563/4 Vis. Yorkshire) (Lumley pedigree: "Thomas Lord Lomley
son & heyr to George = Elsabeth bastard doughter to Kyng Edward the
Fourth"). J. Foster, Pedigrees Recorded at the Visitations of the
County Palatine of Durham (1887), pg. 216 (Lumley pedigree: "Thomas
Lumley, son and heire = Elizabeth, bastard dau. of Edward IV"). C.P.
7 (1929): 30 (sub Hylton); 8 (1932): 274 (sub Lumley); 10 (1945):
33-34. TAG 50 (1974): 81-86. M.S. Byrne, The Lisle Letters (1981)
[citing Harleian MS. 4033, f. 21 (23) v; Leland's Itinerary VI, f.
63]. Chris Given-Wilson & A. Curteis, Royal Bastards of Medieval
England (1984), pp. 160-161,179.

Illegitimate child of Edward IV of England, by a mistress, Elizabeth
Wayte:

i. ARTHUR PLANTAGENET (otherwise ARTHUR WAYTE), K.G., King’s
Spear, Esquire of the Body, Sheriff of Hampshire, Vice-Admiral of
England, Trier of Petitions in Parliament, Governor of Calais, Warden
of the Cinque Ports, Privy Councillor, born say 1475 (presumed to be
“my Lord the Bastard” mentioned in an Exchequer account
dated 1477, first occurs as an adult in 1501). He married (1st) 12
Nov. 1511 ELIZABETH GREY, suo jure Baroness Lisle, widow of Edmund
Dudley, Esq. (beheaded 18 Aug. 1510), and daughter and heiress of
Edward Grey, Knt., Viscount Lisle, by his 1st wife, Elizabeth,
daughter of John Talbot, Knt., Viscount Lisle. They had three
daughters, Frances (wife of John Basset and Thomas Monke), Elizabeth
(wife of Francis Jobson, Knt), and Bridget (wife of William Carden,
Knt.). In 1514 he was captain of the Vice-Admiral's ship "Trinity
Sovereign." He attended the King at the Field of Cloth of Gold in
1520. In consequence of his marriage, he was created 25 Apr. 1523
Viscount Lisle. In 1528 he purchased the manors of Segenworth, Chark,
Lee, Sutton, West Stratton, etc., Hampshire from his cousin, John
Wayte, Esq., of Titchfield. Arthur married (2nd) in 1529 Honor
Grenville, widow of John Basset, Knt. (died 31 Jan. 1522/9), and
daughter of Thomas Grenville, Knt., by his 1st wife, Isabel, daughter
of Otes Gilbert, Knt. They had no issue. He was imprisoned in the
Tower of London on suspicion of treason 19 May 1540. SIR ARTHUR
PLANTAGENET, Viscount Lisle, died there 3 Mar. 1541/2. His widow,
Honor, was buried at Logan, Cornwall 30 Apr. 1566. Modern descendants
(not traced). J. Burke, General & Heraldic Dictionary of the Peerages
... Extinct, Dormant, and in Abeyance (1831), pp. 433,513-514. G.F.
Beltz, Memorials of the Most Noble Order of the Garter (1841), pg.
clxxii. H.S.P. 2 (1870): 74-75 (1619 Vis. Leicester) (Gray pedigree:
"Elizab. [Gray] Nupta Edm. Dudley postea Arthur Plantagenet"); 16
(1881): 308-310 (1563/4 Vis. Yorkshire) (Talbot pedigree: "Elsabeth
[Talbot] doughter & sole heyre [1] = Edmond Dudley on of the Prevy
Consell to Kyng Henry 7th., [2]= Arthur Plantagenet bastard son to
Edward IV. 2 husband"). J.L. Vivian, Visitations of the County of
Devon (1895), pp. 46-47,569. D.N.B. 15 (1909): 1285-1287 (biog. of
Arthur Plantagenet). List of Early Chan. Proc. 5 (1912):
288,358,465,472.473; 6 (1922): 109,134. C.L. Scofield, Life and Reign
of Edward the Fourth 2 (1923): 56,161. C.P. 8 (1932): 63-68 (sub
Lisle). Cal. of Ancient Deeds - Series B Pt. 3 (List & Index Soc.,
vol. 113) (1975): B.10780, B.12180. Ancient Deeds Series BB (List &
Index Soc., vol. 137) (1977), pp. 80-81,83,90. M.S. Byrne, The Lisle
Letters 2 (1981): 63 (Arthur Plantagenet styled "cousin" by Margaret
Pole, Countess of Salisbury); 1 (1981): 481, 4{1981): 140 (instances
of Henry Pole, Lord Montagu, styled "cousin" to Arthur Plantagenet).
Exchequer Ancient Deeds - DD Series (List & Index Soc., vol. 200)
(1983), pp. 193,207. C. Given-Wilson & A. Curteis, Royal Bastards of
Medieval England (1984), pp. 158,161-174.

Alleged illegitimate children of Edward IV of England, by an unknown
mistress (or mistresses), _____:

i. GRACE PLANTAGENET, said to be present in 1492 on the funeral barge
of Queen Elizabeth Wydeville, widow of King Edward IV. C. Ross,
Edward IV (1974), pg. 316, foonote 2 (citing BM Arundel MS. 26, ff.
29v-30v). C. Given-Wilson & A. Curteis, Royal Bastards of Medieval
England (1984), pp. 158,161-174.

ii. _____ PLANTAGENET (daughter), married (as his 1st wife) JOHN
AUDLEY (or TUCHET), younger son of John Audley (or Tuchet), Knt., 6th
Lord Audley, Lord Treasurer of England, by Anne, daughter of Thomas
Echingham, Knt. They had no issue. Collections for a History of
Staffordshire n.s. 12 (1909): 229. MS. pedigree of Audley family
dated 1618 on file at the William SaltCollection at the William Salt
Library in Stafford, England. (These citations kindly provided by
Peter Sutton).

iii. MARY PLANTAGENET, married after 1485 (as his 2nd wife) HENRY
HARMAN, of Ellam (in Crayford), Kent, Clerk of the Crown to King Henry
VII, son of Thomas and Elizabeth Harman. HENRY HARMAN left a will
dated 1501, proved 1502 (P.C.C., 15 Blamyr), naming his deceased wife,
Agnes, his living wife, Mary, and eleven children, George, William,
Thomas, Roger, John, Henry, Robert, Elizabeth (wife of _____ Sparke),
Alice, Beatrice, and Anne. The maternity of the children is
uncertain, but at least the two youngest sons were by Henry Harman's
last wife, Mary, as indicated by Henry's will. Misc. Gen. et Her. 4th
ser. 2 (1908): 227-228 (Harman pedigree) (no identification of wives).
H.S.P. 74 (1923): 61-62 (1574 Vis. Kent) (Harman pedigree: "Henry
Harman Clarke of ye Crowne vnto H: 7 ... This man [Henry Harman] was
H: 7 man to whome he gaue the clarkeship of the Crowne and with all
gaue him the Crest belowe*, depick[t]ed one his armes which Crist was
giuen him after hee had maried with E: 4 daughter") (The latter
citation kindly supplied by James Trabue).

Below is a list of the illegitimate children of King Edward IV of
England taken from variety of sources. The list includes no new
names, but I've commented on additional evidence which appears to
prove the parentage of Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Lumley. Gary Boyd
Roberts's useful book, RD 500, indicates that there are American
descendants of Elizabeth Lumley.

There seems to be confusion in surviving records between King Edward
IV's mistresses, Dame Elizabeth Lucy and Elizabeth Wayte. I suspect
the two women were separate and distinct individuals. King Edward IV
is alleged to have had issue by Elizabeth Lucy prior to his marriage
to Queen Elizabeth Wydeville in 1464. I presume that issue was King
Edward IV's bastard daughter, Elizabeth Lumley, who married in or
before 1477. Elizabeth Wayte's son, Arthur, on the other hand,
doesn't occur in records as an adult until 1501 and didn't marry until
1511. This suggests a rather wide gap in ages between the two
bastards, Elizabeth Lumley and Arthur Plantagenet. My best guess is
that Elizabeth Lumley was born say 1460/2 and that Arthur Plantagenet
was born say 1475.

If anyone has any corrections or additions to the list below, I'd
appreciate it if they would post them here on the newsgroup.

Best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah

E-mail: royalancestry@msn.com 
ENGLAND Edward IV King Of
 
106 Presumed to have been murdered by his uncle, King Richard III.
http://tudorhistory.org/people/eyork/ 
ENGLAND Edward V King Of
 
107 I, Edward the Eighth, of Great Britain, Ireland, and the British Dominions beyond the Seas, King, Emperor of India, do hereby declare My irrevocable determination to renounce the Throne for Myself and for My descendants, and My desire that effect should be given to this Instrument of Abdication immediately. ENGLAND Edward VIII, King of
 
108 http://history.vineyard.net//allen/Web%20Cards/WC12/WC12_442.HTM ENGLAND Elfleda Queen Of
 
109 http://tudorhistory.org/people/eyork/ ENGLAND Elizabeth of York Queen Of
 
110 There was never any question of Gundred being an illegitimate daughter of William I, but rather it was a case of a fraudulent claim that she was a legitimate daughter. The reason people used to think that Gundred was a daughter of William the Conqueror was because the monks of Lewes forged some charters which stated that. But I don't think anyone now seriously maintains that these charters are authentic.

Gundred is known to have been a sister of Gerbod, who was briefly earl of Chester under William the Conqueror. It's clear they were members of a Flemish family who were advocates of St Bertin's Abbey in St Omer, and who held Oosterzele and Scheldewindeke, although the genealogy isn't altogether clear.

Chris Phillips

Gundred was a sister of Gerbod the Fleming, earl of Chester, and possibly a
daughter of Gerbod, hereditary advocate of the abbey of St. Bertin at St.
Omer. Many sources name her as the daughter of William the Conqueror and
his wife Matilda, and she has also been put forth as a daughter or
stepdaughter of William the Conqueror. This, however, was shown to be false
many years ago. She died in childbirth.

David C. Douglas contends in "William the Conqueror: The Norman Impact Upon
England" (Berkeley: Univ of Calif Press, 1964): "The view once held that
Matilda was already married [to Gerbod] when William sought her hand, and
was then the mother of a daughter, Gundrada, later the wife of William de
Warenne, has now been conclusively disproved by the researches of Chester
Waters and Sir Charles Clay. There is no reason to suppose that Gundrada
was the daughter of either William or Matilda."

DD says: "Sister of Gerbod the Fleming,advocate of Saint-Bertin and earl of
Chester in 1070, and Frederick. Wife of William I de Warenne. She died in
childbirth on 27 May 1085 and was buried in Lewes priory (Mon. Ang. v,12).
EYC viii,pp. 6-7; A. J. Farrington, 'A note on Gherbod the Fleming, Earl of
Chester', Journal of the Chester Archaeological Society li (1984)."

Hope this helps. Polly Zashin

PLM: There is some doubt in my mind, however. Per your earlier assistance to
me; I do now have "The Chartulary of the Priory of St. Pancras of Lewes",
vol. I, ed. L. F. Salzman, and published by the Sussex Record Society in
1032. There is a lengthy charter by William Warrene nearly six pages in
length; so I will not quote it's entirety, but this bit is curious.

Page 3:

"..., I have given for the welfare of my soul and that of Gundrada my wife
and for the soul of my lord King William who brought me into England and by
whose license I caused the monks to come and who confirmed my former gift,
and for the welfare of my lady Queen Maud the mother of my wife and for the
welfare of my lord King William his son after whose coming to England I made
this charter and who made me Earl of Surrey,..." UNQ

PLM: It is quite clear from this charter, that Gundrada is the daughter of
Queen Maud, and the lack of a reference to William I being the father of
Gundrada is highly significant. If I were to rely solely on this evidence, I
would have to conclude that Gundrada was NOT the daughter of William I at
all.

People have referred to forged charters from Lewes, but what is the basis of
these assertions, and which references discuss these "supposedly proven
forgeries"? The premise of such an accusation appears to be up side down, in
relation to the above charter. It seems illogical to forge a document that
makes Gundrada the daughter of the Queen, as opposed to the King of England;
which would essentially diminish her social standing, instead of elevating
it, as most forgeries tend to do?

Cheers,
Phil 
ENGLAND Gundred Princess Of
 
111 Do we have a date in 1203 as to when Joan was sent to England from
Normandy? This would be interesting and possibly enlightening - John himself
was in Normandy during most of that year, in Le Mans in January but then
moving into Normandy near Argentan and not leaving Normandy (although this
time, for good) on 5 December. As recorded by Giraldus Cambrensis and the
author of the Histoire de Guillaume le Marechal, John was clearly in the
process of losing hold of Normandy during that year, so it would seem Joan's
relocation to England was part of the overall process of collapse.

As to the issue of Henry I's issue, it may be that he thought the
alliances of his illegitimate brood would not complicate the matter of
succession - however, immediate prior history does not mesh well with this
presumption. The 70-year period preceding Henry I's death involved several
problematic dynastic problems:

A. The forceful taking of the English throne by a bastard (his own
father);

B. The lengthy contest for the throne between two brothers (his own, being Robert 'Curthose' and William 'Rufus')

C. His own acquisition of the English throne on the death of William
'Rufus', in place of his absent elder brother Robert, in 1100 [the
resolution of their claims not being decided except on the field of battle in
1106, at Tinchebrai].

Henry I's evident desire was for the succession of his son (or at
least one of his sons), and failing that, the succession of his daughter
Matilda. He knew full well, little was guaranteed as to the English
succession, else he would not have required baronial agreement to Matilda's
succession before his death. Do we know, in the event of Matilda's death,
that he would not prefer the accession of his son Robert (the bastard known
as Robert de Caen, the Earl of Gloucester) over any available nephew ?

Best regards,
John P. Ravilious
Therav3@aol.com 
ENGLAND Henry II "Plantagenet" King Of
 
112 England was a Catholic country until Henry VIII founded the Church of England. He founded the Church of England because the Pope would not annul his marriage to Katherine of Aragon. The grounds were that Katherine had already been espoused to his brother, Arthur, so Henry felt the marriage should be annulled because it never should have taken place. That it was just Henry's ruse to dispose of his wife so he could take another, is beside the point. The Pope would not grant the annulment. So Henry divorced Katherine by civil law, by which his daughter, Mary, was declared illegitimate, and Henry became Head of the Church of England, just as the Queen is today.

Renia
renia.s@ntlworld.com 
ENGLAND Henry VIII King Of
 
113 The only place where her mother is named is in the Tewkesbury Annals, where
Joan's death is recorded. The Tewkesbury annalist says Joan was a daughter
of King John and of "Regina Clementia". Nobody knows who this "Queen
Clementia" was.

William Addams Reitwiesner
wrei@erols.com 
ENGLAND Joan Princess Of
 
114 Please find below a revised listing of the bastard children of King
John. The list has been augmented by many new references,
corrections, and additions since my last posting of this listing. The
new listing includes Philip "Fiz Le Rey" [i.e., Philip the king's
son]) found in a 1263 Sussex fine as a possible bastard child of King
John.

Also, it appears there may be a link between Isabel, wife of Richard
Fitz Ives, and another royal bastard, Eudes Fitz Roy. I've learned
that in 1245, Isabel's son and heir, William Fitz Ives, sued Giles de
Chanceaux regarding property in Cornwall. This is surely the same man
who was granted Eudes Fitz Roy's properties in Essex on his death
without issue in 1242. The Fitz Ives and Chanceaux link deserves
further study.

Comments are invited.

Best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah

- - - - - - - - - -

REVISED LISTING OF BASTARD CHILDREN OF KING JOHN OF ENGLAND:

Legitimated child of John of England, by a mistress, Clemence _____:

i. JOAN OF ENGLAND, married LLYWELYN AP IORWERTH, Prince of North
Wales [see WAKE 4].

Illegitimate child of John of England, by a mistress, _____ de
Warenne, daughter of Hamelin, 5th Earl of Surrey, by Isabel, daughter
and heiress of William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey [see WARENNE 2]:

i. RICHARD FITZ ROY (or DE WARENNE), Knt., Baron of Chilham, Kent,
married ROSE DE DOVER [see ATHOLL 4].

Illegitimate child of John of England, by a mistress, Hawise _____:

i. OLIVER FITZ ROY. He defended Wolvesey Castle for Peter des Roches,
Bishop of Winchester, in 1216. In 1217 he was granted the lands
formerly held by Peter Fitz Herbert to sustain him in the king's
service. In 1218 he arrived with other English knights at Damietta in
the company of Papal legate, Pelayo. He did not return. H.R. Luard,
Chronica Majora 3 (1876): 40-41. C.P.R., 1216-1225 (1901), pp.
42-43,92. S. Painter, Reign of King John (1949), pp. 232-233. NEHGR
119 (1965): 94-102. J.M. Powell, Anatomy of a Crusade (1986), pg.
235. N. Vincent, Peter des Roches (1996), pp. 71,175.

Illegitimate children of John of England, by an unknown mistress (or
mistresses):

i. JOHN FITZ ROY, evidently a clerk, supported by the custodians of
the see of Lincoln in 1201. D.M. Stenton, Great Roll of the Pipe
Michaelmas 1201 (Pipe Roll Soc., n.s., vol. 14) (1936), pp.
xix,192-193. S. Painter, Reign of King John (1949), pp. 232-233.
NEHGR 119 (1965): 94-102.

ii. GEOFFREY FITZ ROY. In 1204 he received a loan by the pledge of
William Longespée, Earl of Salisbury, and Peter de Stokes. In 1205 he
led an expedition into Poitou and died the same year. Curia Regis
Rolls 3 (1926): 321 (suit dated 1205: " ... quam diu predictus
Radulfus [de Trublevill] fuerit in servicio nostro in Pictavia cum
Gaufrido filio nostro"). D.M. Stenton, Great Roll of the Pipe
Michaelmas 1204 (Pipe Roll Soc., n.s., vol. 18) (1940), pp.
xxxv-xxxvj,xlj,33,60,87,131. D.M. Stenton, Great Roll of the Pipe
Michaelmas 1205 (Pipe Roll Soc., n.s., vol. 19) (1941), pp.
xviij-xix,19,79-80. S. Painter, Reign of King John (1949), pp.
232-233. NEHGR 119 (1965): 94-102.

iii. HENRY FITZ ROY, Knt., of Waltham, Ashby, Brigsley, Gonerby (in
Hatcliffe), Hawerby, and North Coates, co. Lincoln, and Chilham, Kent.
He was sent as a student to the Prior of Kenilworth in 1207. In 1215
he was granted the lands of Robert Fitz Walter in Cornwall. In 1217
he and Ralph de Raleigh were granted the manor of Waltham, co. Lincoln
formerly held by Alan Fitz Count to sustain them in royal service. In
1231 he was granted all of the land of Henry de Avaugor, a Norman, in
Waltham, co. Lincoln. He married before 1236 EVE DE BLANCHMINSTER (or
WHITCHURCH), widow of William de Champernoun (living 1230), of
Umberleigh (in Atherington) and High Bickington, Devon, and daughter
and heiress of Reynold de Blanchminster (or Whitchurch) (living 1248),
of Shrivenham and Winterbourne (in Chieveley), co. Berks, and Bolney,
co. Oxford, by his 1st wife, Alice, daughter and co-heiress of
Nicholas de Bolney. They had no issue. SIR HENRY FITZ ROY died
shortly before 8 Apr. 1245. His widow, Eve, married (3rd) before 30
June 1252 Giles de Clifford (living 1276). C.Ch.R. 1 (1895): 137
(styled "Henry the king's brother"). J.L. Vivian, Visitations of the
County of Devon (1895), pp. 160. C.P.R., 1216-1225 (1901), pp. 128,
574 ("Henricus filius regis"). C.C.R., 1227-1231 (1902), pg. 51.
C.P.R., 1225-1232 (1903), pp. 311 ("Henricus frater regis"), 357,441.
C.C.R., 1234-1237 (1908), pg. 219 ("Henrico fratri regis"). Book of
Fees 1 (1920): 362 ("Henricus frater regis"), 617 ("Henricus filius
regis"); 2 (1923): 660,675,1021 (instances of "Henricus filius
Regis"). C.P.R., 1232-1247 (1906), pp. 20,296,450. C.C.R., 1237-1242
(1911), pg. 511 ("Henricum filium regis"). VCH Berkshire 3 (19??):
424; 4 (1924): 63,513,533. C.C.R., 1251-1253 (1927), pg. 116. S.
Painter, Reign of King John (1949), pp. 232-233. C.P. 12 Pt. 2
(1959): 645 (sub Wilington). Curia Regis Rolls 13 (1959): 138,215,283
("Henricus filius regis John"), 290,364-365,371,514,542; 15 (1972):
83,449 (styled "Henricum filium le Rey"). R.A. Brown, Memoranda Roll
for the Tenth Year of the Reign of King John (1207-8) (Pipe Roll Soc.,
n.s., vol. 31) (1957), pg. 137 (Henry called "our son" [filio nostro]
by King John). NEHGR 119 (1965): 94-102. B.R. Kemp, Reading Abbey
Cartularies 1 (Camden, 4th ser., vol. 31) (1986): 375. S.D. Church,
Household Knights of King John (1999), pg. 127.

iv. OSBERT GIFFORD, Knt. In 1215 he received the lands of Thomas de
Ardern in Oxfordshire. In 1216 he likewise received Ardern's lands in
Bundes, Norfolk, and elsewhere in Suffolk, Essex, and Sussex, and the
lands of Aumary Despenser, Roger Fitz Nicholas, and Ralph Bluet in
Oxfordshire. SIR OSBERT GIFFORD died in 1248. Ancestor 3 (1902): 227
(his arms: Ermine two bars gules, on a chief gules a leopard or).
Genealogist n.s. 28 (1922): 128-129. S. Painter, Reign of King John
(1949), pp. 232-233. NEHGR 119 (1965): 94-102. T.D. Tremlett, Rolls
of Arms Henry III (Harleian Soc. Pub., vols. 113-114) (1967), pg. 47.

v. EUDES (or IVES) FITZ ROY, of Canewdon, Essex. In 1233 he was
granted lands in Aldbury, co. Hertford. He had an exchequer fee of
£20 granted to him in 1237. In the period, c. 1227/41, he witnessed a
charter for his brother, Richard, Earl of Cornwall, to Launceston
Priory in Cornwall. In 1240 he joined Earl Richard on a crusade to
the Holy Land. EUDES FITZ ROY died there testate shortly before 21
Jan. 1241/2. His lands in Essex were granted to Giles de Chanceaux in
1242. No known descendants. G. Oliver, Monasticon Diocesis
Exonienses (1846), pg. 23. C.C.R., 1231-1234 (1905), pg. 210 ("Eudoni
filio regis"). C.P.R., 1232-1247 (1906), pp. 179 ("Eudo the king's
brother"), 270 ("Eudo son of R. the king's brother"), 314 ("Eudo the
king's brother"). C.C.R., 1237-1242 (1911), pp. 73 ("Eudoni fratri
regis"), 386-387 ("Eudonis fratris regis"), 387 ("Ivonis fratris
domini regis"), 532 ("Eudonis fratris nostri"). Cal. Liberate Rolls 1
(1916), pg. 263. N. Denholm-Young, Richard of Cornwall (1947), pp.
41,112. P.L. Hull, Cartulary of Launceston Priory (Devon & Cornwall
Rec. Soc., n.s., vol. 30) (1987) 12 ("Yvo brother of the earl"
[Richard, Earl of Cornwall]).

vi. BARTHOLOMEW FITZ ROY, clerk, papal chaplain, member of the order
of Friars Preachers, living Aug. 1254. Papal Registers: Letters 1
(1893): 281,286,305.

vii. MAUD FITZ ROY, nun, elected Abbess of Barking 5 Aug. 1247; died
shortly before 6 Feb. 1252. Sir William Dugdale, Monasticon
Anglicanum 1 (1817): 437,441 ("Dame Maud la file le Roy John"). VCH
Essex 2 (1907): 120.

Alleged illegitimate child of John of England, by an unknown mistress,
_____:

i. ISABEL FITZ ROY, married RICHARD FITZ IVES, Knt., lord of Degembris
(in Newlyn East), Cornwall. They had two sons, William Fitz Richard,
Knt. (of Degembris and Penhallow [both in Newlyn East], Lanisley (in
Gulival), and Rosneython and Trenoweth-Chammon [both in St. Keverne])
and Richard Fitz Richard (clerk), and one daughter, Isabel (wife of
Belyn Hellegan, Knt.). He gave tithes in Gruguth (in St. Keverne),
Cornwall. SIR RICHARD FITZ IVES allegedly died in 1207. Modern
descendants (not traced). Herald and Genealogist 7 (1873): 229-231
(Isabel styled "filie Regis Joh'is"). Sir John Maclean, Parochial and
Family Hist. of the Deanery of Trigg Minor 1 (1876): 317. J.L.
Vivian, Visitations of Cornwall (1887), pg. 30. G.D. Stawell, A
Quantock Family: The Stawells of Cothelstone and their Descendants
(1910), pp. 44-45. J.H. Rowe, Cornwall Feet of Fines 1 (1914):
17,49,54-55,58-59,91-92,171,438-440. C.R.R. 11 (1955), pg. 473; 12
(1957): 189. NEHGR 119 (1965): 94-102. C.R.R. 18 (1999): 362-363.
Harleian MS. 4031, ff. 76b,81.

Possible illegitimate child of John of England, by an unknown
mistress, _____:

i. PHILIP FITZ ROY (possible child). In 1263 he and his wife, Lavina,
conveyed lands at Bignor, Pebmarsh, and Petworth, Surrey to Henry Fitz
[le] Roy, perhaps their son. L.F. Salzman, Abstract of Feet of Fines
Relating to the County of Sussex (Sussex Rec. Soc., vol. 7) (1908),
pg. 45 ("Ph[illip]um Fiz Le Rey" [i.e., Philip the king's son]) (cf.
W. Hudson, Three Earliest Subsidies for the County of Sussex in the
Years 1296,1327,1332 (Sussex Rec. Soc., vol. 19) (1910), pp. 73,95
(references to "Henr[icus] fyz le Rey" on 1296 Sussex subsidy).

The following is a list of eleven bastard children of King John of
England which I've assembled from a variety of sources. If anyone has
any additions or corrections to this material, please let me know.
The first two children listed, Richard Fitz Roy (or de Warenne), Baron
of Chilham, Kent, and Joan, wife of Llywelyn ap Iowerth, Prince of
North Wales, have many modern descendants.

Although sometimes questioned, I accept Isabel, wife of Richard Fitz
Ives, Knt., as a bastard daughter of King John. Isabel appears to
have modern descendants. Besides Isabel, I've also included a new
bastard child for King John not commonly found on such lists, namely
Maud Fitz Roy, Abbess of Barking, whose identity is proven by the
sources cited below.

Sidney Painter, King John's historian, says of him: ".... cruel,
lecherous, and deceitful." Surely the number of illegitimate children
listed below for King John proves the lecherous part.

Best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah

E-mail: royalancestry@msn.com

- - - - - - - - - - - -
BASTARD CHILDREN OF KING JOHN OF ENGLAND

Illegitimate child of John of England, by a mistress, _____ de
Warenne:

i. RICHARD FITZ ROY (or DE WARENNE), Knt., Baron of Chilham, Kent,
married ROSE DE DOVER [see ATHOLL 4].

Illegitimate child of John of England, by a mistress, Clemence _____:

i. JOAN OF ENGLAND, married LLYWELYN AP IORWERTH, Prince of North
Wales [see WAKE 4].

Illegitimate child of John of England, by a mistress, Hawise _____:

i. OLIVER FITZ ROY. He defended Wolvesey Castle for Peter des Roches,
Bishop of Winchester, in 1216. In 1217 he was granted the lands
formerly held by Peter Fitz Herbert to sustain him in the king';s
service. In 1218 he arrived with other English knights at Damietta in
the company of Papal legate, Pelayo. He did not return. H.R. Luard,
Chronica Majora 3 (1876): 40-41. C.P.R., 1216-1225 (1901), pp.
42-43,92. S. Painter, Reign of King John (1949), pp. 232-233. NEHGR
119 (1965): 94-102. J.M. Powell, Anatomy of a Crusade (1986), pg.
235. N. Vincent, Peter des Roches (1996), pp. 71,175.

Illegitimate children of John of England, by an unknown mistress (or
mistresses):

i. ISABEL FITZ ROY, married RICHARD FITZ IVES, Knt., lord of Degembris
(in Newlyn East), Cornwall. They had two sons, William Fitz Richard,
Knt. (of Degembris and Penhallow [both in Newlyn East], Lanisley, and
Rosneython [in St. Keverne]) and Richard Fitz Richard (clerk), and one
daughter, Isabel (wife of Belyn Hellegan, Knt.). He gave tithes in
Gruguth (in St. Keverne), Cornwall. SIR RICHARD FITZ IVES died in
1207. Modern descendants (not traced in this book). Herald and
Genealogist 7 (1873): 229-231. Sir John Maclean, Parochial and Family
Hist. of the Deanery of Trigg Minor 1 (1876): 317. J.L. Vivian,
Visitations of Cornwall (1887), pg. 30. J.H. Rowe, Cornwall Feet of
Fines 1 (1914): 17,49,54-55,58-59,91-92,171,438-440. NEHGR 119
(1965): 94-102. Harleian MS. 4031, ff. 76b,81 (not seen).

ii. JOHN FITZ ROY, evidently a clerk, supported by the custodians of
the see of Lincoln in 1201. D.M. Stenton, Great Roll of the Pipe
Michaelmas 1201 (Pipe Roll Soc., n.s., vol. 14) (1936), pp.
xix,192-193. S. Painter, Reign of King John (1949), pp. 232-233.
NEHGR 119 (1965): 94-102.

iii. GEOFFREY FITZ ROY. In 1204 he received a loan by the pledge of
William Longespée, Earl of Salisbury, and Peter de Stokes. In 1205 he
led an expedition into Poitou and died the same year. Curia Regis
Rolls 3 (1926): 321 (suit dated 1205: "... quam diu predictus Radulfus
[de Trublevill] fuerit in servicio nostro in Pictavia cum Gaufrido
filio nostro"). D.M. Stenton, Great Roll of the Pipe Michaelmas 1204
(Pipe Roll Soc., n.s., vol. 18) (1940), pp.
xxxv-xxxvj,xlj,33,60,87,131. D.M. Stenton Great Roll of the Pipe
Michaelmas 1205 (Pipe Roll Soc., n.s., vol. 19) (1941), pp.
xviij-xix,19,79-80. S. Painter, Reign of King John (1949), pp.
232-233. NEHGR 119 (1965): 94-102.

iv. HENRY FITZ ROY, Knt., of Waltham, Ashby, Brigsley, Gonerby (in
Hatcliffe), Hawerby, and North Coates, co. Lincoln, and Chilham, Kent.
He was sent as a student to the Prior of Kenilworth in 1207. In 1215
he was granted the lands of Robert Fitz Walter in Cornwall. In 1217
he and Ralph de Raleigh were granted the manor of Waltham, co. Lincoln
to sustain them in royal service. In 1231 he was granted all of the
land of Henry de la Vaugoz, a Norman, in the soke of Waltham, co.
Lincoln. He married before 1236 EVE DE WHITCHURCH, widow of William
de Champernoun (living 1230), of Umberleigh (in Atherington) and High
Bickington, Devon, and daughter and heiress of Reynold de Whitchurch,
of Shrivenham and Winterbourne (in Chieveley), co. Berks, by his 1st
wife, Alice, daughter and co-heiress of Nicholas de Bolney. They had
no issue. SIR HENRY FITZ ROY died shortly before 8 Apr. 1245. His
widow, Eve, married (3rd) before 30 June 1252 Giles de Clifford
(living 1276). C.Ch.R. 1 (1895): 137. J.L. Vivian, Visitations of
the County of Devon (1895), pp. 160. Book of Fees 1: 362,617; 2
(1923): 660,675,1021. C.P.R., 1232-1247 (1906), pp. 20,296,450.
C.C.R., 1237-1242 (1911), pg. 511. VCH Berkshire 4 (1924): 63,533.
C.C.R., 1251-1253 (1927), pg. 116. S. Painter, Reign of King John
(1949), pp. 232-233. NEHGR 119 (1965): 94-102. C.P. 12 Pt. 2 (1959):
645 (sub Wilington). Curia Regis Rolls 13 (1959): 514; 15 (1972):
83,449. S.D. Church, Household Knights of King John (1999), pg. 127.

v. OSBERT GIFFORD. In 1215 he received the lands of Thomas de Ardern
in Oxfordshire. In 1216 he likewise received Ardern's lands in
Norfolk, Suffolk, and Sussex. In 1216 he and his wife received safe
conduct to confer with King John. His subsequent history is unknown.
Ancestor 3 (1902): 227 (his arms: Ermine, 2 bars gules, a chief gules
with a leopard or in chief). Genealogist n.s. 28 (1922): 128-129. S.
Painter, Reign of King John (1949), pp. 232-233. NEHGR 119 (1965):
94-102.

vi. EUDES FITZ ROY, of Canewdon, Essex. In 1233 he was granted lands
in Aldbury, co. Hertford. He had an exchequer fee iof £20 granted to
him in 1237. In 1240 he joined his half-brother, Richard, Earl of
Cornwall on a crusade to the Holy Land. EUDES FITZ ROY died there
testate shortly before 21 Jan. 1241/2. His lands in Essex were
granted to Giles de Chanceaus in 1242. No known descendants. G.
Oliver, Monasticon Diocesis Exonienses (1846), pg. 23. C.C.R.,
1231-1234 (1905), pg. 210. C.P.R., 1232-1247 (1906), pp. 179,270,314.
C.C.R., 1237-1242 (1911), pp. 387,532. Cal. Liberate Rolls 1 (1916),
pg. 263. N. Denholm-Young, Richard of Cornwall (1947), pp. 41,112.

vii. BARTHOLOMEW FITZ ROY, clerk, papal chaplain, member of the order
of Friars Preachers, living Aug. 1254. Papal Registers: Letters 1
(1893): 281,286,305.

viii. MAUD FITZ ROY, nun, elected Abbess of Barking 5 Aug. 1247; died
shortly before 6 Feb. 1252. Sir William Dugdale, Monasticon
Anglicanum 1 (1817): 437,441. VCH Essex 2 (1907): 120.


Signed Magna Carta in 1215

The statement in the legitimization of Joan, daughter of king
John and wife of prince Llywelyn, that each of her parents were
unmarried at the time of her birth, does not imply she was born
prior to John's first marriage, to Isabelle de Clare in 1189.
This marriage had been annulled by the time of Joan's
legitimization, and would have been considered by the clerics
not to have occurred.

It might be that the legitimization does imply that, by the
time of John's second marriage, to Isabelle of Angouleme, that
Joan's mother was either dead or had become a nun, otherwise the
legitimacy of king Henry III might have been called into
question.

It might also be that the reference in Joan's obituary to her
mother as "queen Clementia" implies that Clemence, mother of
Joan, did not die or become a nun until after John's accession.

I suspect that in the minds of the monks and clerics who
recorded things, these annulments and legitimizations created a
virtual world in which annulled real world marriages did not
exist, and appropriate legitimizing marriages did exist, with
all appropriate side effect implications, including Clemence
having been queen..

- Paul K. Davis - paulkdavis@earthlink.net

King John had illegitimate children over the entire course of
his adult life. He was a very busy man in the bedroom. One of his
older bastard sons, Geoffrey, received a loan by the pledge of William
Longespée, Earl of Salisbury, and Peter de Stokes in 1204. In 1205 he
led an expedition into Poitou and died the same year. King John
likewise had another illegitimate daughter, Joan, who married before
23 Mar. 1204/5 Llywelyn ap Iowerth, Prince of North Wales.
Consequently, it is possible that King John was the father of Isabel,
wife of Richard Fitz Ives, who allegedly died in 1207. By the way, I
have reason to suppose that Isabel survived Richard Fitz Ives for many
years and remarried.

Second, Isabel de Beaupre is not the same person as King John's
bastard daughter, Isabel, wife of Richard Fitz Ives. As best I can
tell, Isabel de Beaupre is a later day descendant and the senior
heiress of the Fitz Ives family. I didn't mean to imply that the two
Isabel's were the same person.

Best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah 
ENGLAND John "Lackland" King Of
 
115 Presumed to have been murdered by his uncle, King Richard III.
http://tudorhistory.org/people/eyork/ 
ENGLAND Richard Prince Of
 
116 http://www.utb.boras.se/uk/se/projekt/history/articles/vasa/vasa5.htm ERIKSSON KING OF SWEDEN VASA Gustaf I
 
117 There is an entry in the /Patent Rolls of the Reign of Henry III/
[1225-1232] (London, 1903), p. 230 (m. 11) that might suggest an area of
future research regarding this Clementia. This entry also provides evidence
for the existence of Susanna, daughter of Llywelyn and Joan.

-Robert Battle 
FAWR Susanna
 
118 1881 Census Place: Ilkeston, Derbys. Source: FHL Film 1341793 PRO Ref RG11 Piece 3325 Folio 113 Page 29
Dwelling: 52 Primrose Hill
Mary FEARN W 38 F Ilkeston, Derby, England Rel: Head
John FEARN U 17 M Ilkeston, Derby, England Rel: Son Occ: Coal Miner
Ruth FEARN U 16 F Ilkeston, Derby, England Rel: Daur Occ: Lace Clipper
George FEARN 14 M Ilkeston, Derby, England Rel: Son Occ: Coal Miner
Joseph FEARN 7 M Ilkeston, Derby, England Rel: Son Occ: Scholar
Sarah Jane FEARN 6 F Ilkeston, Derby, England Rel: Daur Occ: Scholar
Millicent FEARN 6 mths F Ilkeston, Derby, England Rel: Daur Occ: Infant

AND Family History Library Film 1341793
Got Elisha Fearn as Buried on 13 Nov 1880 - Died year before!
Also got Christening of Elisha of Elisha & Mary Fearn Cotmanhay, Miner on 5 Feb 1873. AND Burial of Elisha 23 Feb 1877. aged 4.
ALSO another ELISHA Fearn Cotmanhay died 5 May 1878 aged 9 Months!

Christening of Millicent of Elisha & Mary Fearn Cotmanhay, Miner on 31 July 1881. 
FEARN Elisha
 
119 1881 Census Place: Ilkeston, Derbys. Source: FHL Film 1341793 PRO Ref RG11 Piece 3325 Folio 113 Page 29
Dwelling: 52 Primrose Hill
Mary FEARN W 38 F Ilkeston, Derby, England Rel: Head
John FEARN U 17 M Ilkeston, Derby, England Rel: Son Occ: Coal Miner
Ruth FEARN U 16 F Ilkeston, Derby, England Rel: Daur Occ: Lace Clipper
George FEARN 14 M Ilkeston, Derby, England Rel: Son Occ: Coal Miner
Joseph FEARN 7 M Ilkeston, Derby, England Rel: Son Occ: Scholar
Sarah Jane FEARN 6 F Ilkeston, Derby, England Rel: Daur Occ: Scholar
Millicent FEARN 6 mths F Ilkeston, Derby, England Rel: Daur Occ: Infant

Got Elisha Fearn as Buried on 13 Nov 1880 - Died year before!
Also got Christening of Elisha of Elisha & Mary Fearn Cotmanhay, Miner on 5 Feb 1873. AND Burial of Elisha 23 Feb 1877. aged 4.
ALSO another ELISHA Fearn Cotmanhay died 5 May 1878 aged 9 Months!

Christening of Millicent of Elisha & Mary Fearn Cotmanhay, Miner on 31 July 1881.

1891 Census: RG12 2664
40, Bridge Street, Ilkeston.
George Fearn Head 24 Coal Miner Ilkeston
Mary Jane Fearn Wife 27
John W H(allam) Son 6 Scholar Shipley
Cisley Neice 5 Ilkeston

1901 Census: RG13 3148
30, Stratford Street, Ilkeston
George Fearn Head 34 Coal Hewer Derbys Ilkeston
Mary Jane Wife 37 Derbys Ilkeston
Jno Wm H Son 16 Coal Hewer Derbys Shipley
Ged Son 8 Derbys Ilkeston
John?? Son 5 Derbys Ilkeston 
FEARN George
 
120 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
121 Elizabeth FISHER
Sex: F

Event(s):
Christening: 10 Dec 1826
Selston, Nottingham, England

Parents:
Father: Willm. FISHER
Mother: Elisabeth

Source Information:
Batch number: Dates Source Call No. Type Printout Call No. Type
P015741 1694-1875 0095048 , 0095050 Film 1235440 Film
P015741 1694-1875 0095048 , 0095050 Film NONE
 
FISHER Elizabeth
 
122 William FISHER
Sex: M

Event(s):
Christening: 24 Jun 1804
Selston, Nottingham, England

Parents:
Father: William FISHER
Mother: Sarah


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Source Information:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Batch number: Dates Source Call No. Type Printout Call No. Type
P015741 1694-1875 0095048 , 0095050 Film 1235440 Film
P015741 1694-1875 0095048 , 0095050 Film NONE
 
FISHER William
 
123 Lady Elizabeth Fitzalan is a very prolific ancestor and her descendants can be found everywhere. Here are a few groups of descendants :

Gateway ancestors to the USA
Dr.Richard Palgrave
Mary Palgrave
Saraj Palgrave
Elizabeth Palgrave
Muriel Gurdon
Rev. Hawte Wyatt
Grace Chetwode
Herbert Pelham
Elizabeth Bosvile
Maria Joanna Somerset
Anne Humphrey
William Randolph
Nicholas Sewall

Presidents and one Vice-President
George Clinton, Vice-President
Thomas Jefferson, 3rd President
John Quincy Adams, 6th President
Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 32nd President
George Herbert Bush, 41st President
George Walker Bush, 43rd President

Crowned Heads
Elizabeth II, Queen of Great Britain
Albert II, King of Belgium
Michael I, King of Roumania
Peter II, King of Yugoslavia
Umberto II, King of Italy
Simeon II, King of Bulgaria

also
Rachel Ward
Alice Keppel
Camilla Parker-Bowles

Best wishes
Leo van de Pas
Canberra, Australia 
FITZALAN Elizabeth
 
124 According to other sources, we know that John Fitz Alan was born 14 Sep. 1246, whereas the fine was dated 14 May 1260. As such, the fine was recorded a mere four months before John Fitz Alan reached his 14th birthday. The fine was evidently part of the preparations the parents of the two parties took immediately prior to the consumation of the marriage.

The wording of this fine reflects the fact that by medieval custom, couples betrothed as children were considered married, regardless of the fact that their marriage had not yet been consumated. As such, I believe it is incorrect to say there was a difference in Latin phrases, "led in marriage" or "married" in this time period. As we can see in this fine, the bethrothed couple are called "married," even though the fine makes it clear that the marriage was not consumated.

As a side note, the bride in this fine, Isabel de Mortimer, was grandaughter of the ever popular Gladys Dhu, daughter of Llewelyn ap Iowerth, Prince of North Wales. The marriage between Isabel de Mortimer and John Fitz Alan was in due course consumated and surviving children born to the marriage. The manor of Chipping Norton, co. Oxford mentioned in the fine descended in the Fitz Alan family until about 1385, when it was settled by Richard de Arundel, 11th Earl of Arundel, on his niece, Philippe Arundel, wife of Richard Sergeaux, in satisfaction of her claims on her grandfather, the 10th Earl's estate. The manor was subsequently held by Philippe (Arundel) Sergeaux's descendants.

Best always,

Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah, Home of the Winter 2002 Olympics

E-mail: royalancestry@msn.com

- - - - - - - - -

Rev. H. E. Salter The Feet of Fines for Oxfordshire, 1195-1291 (Oxfordshire Record Society, vol. 12)(1930), pp. 241-242.

378. 44 Hen. III. Westm', morrow of the Ascension [14 May, 1260]; Rog. de Mortuo Mari quer., Ioh. fil. Alani deforc.; 100 marcates of land in Norton [Chipping Norton] and Acton'; plea of covenant; Ioh. recognized that if he outlives John his son who married Isabella, the daughter of R. before he was 14 14 years old, the 100 marcates shall remain to I. for life as dos; also if John when he reaches 14 years refuses the contract of marriage, she shall have the money for life for her maintenance; in return R. granted to Isabella 40 librates of land in Andinton in Shropshire as matrimonium, to be held by John and Isabella and the issue of the marriage; if there is no issue, it shall revert aftet the death of Isabella to R. and his heirs." (C.P. 25. 283. 15). 
FITZALAN John
 
125 I've been researching the history of Henry Fitz Roy, a previously little noticed illegitimate son of King John. Below I have posted what information I have collected on this individual. If anyone has anything else to add on this man, I'd appreciate knowing about it. Henry's one known wife, Eve de Whitchurch, was the mother by a prior marriage to Joan Champernoun, wife of Ralph de Willington. Joanappears to have been Eve's sole heiress. She appears in Complete Peerage under Wilington. I assume Henry Fitz Roy had a previous marriage, but, if so, I don't have those particulars. I've been unable to trace the subsequent history of Henry's lands or any descendants.

Interestingly, Eve de Whitchurch's 3rd husband was Giles de Clifford, who I believe is a member of the well known Clifford family.

Best always, Douglas Richardson,Salt Lake City, Utah

E-mail: royalancestry@msn.com 
FITZROY Henry
 
126 King John's bastard son, Richard Fitz Roy, was known under several designations as follows:.

Cal. of Liberate Rolls 2 (1930): 136 (Richard de Chilham styled
"king';s brother"). Curia Regis Rolls 16 (1979): 115,145,169,178
(instances of being styled "Ricardus de Chilham"), 175 (styled
"Ricardus Fiz le Roy"), 232 (styled "Ricardus de Warenn' filius regis
Johannis"), 450 (styled "Ricardus de Warein'"); 17 (1991): 26 (styled
"Ricardus filius Regis de Chileham").

One of Richard's seals which has survived calls him Richard de
Warenne. Due to his various forms, I have elected to call him Richard
Fitz Roy (otherwise de Warenne, also de Chilham) in the forthcoming
book, Plantagenet Ancestry.

Interestingly, Richard's son, Richard the younger, was known as both
"de Dover" and "de Chilham" as appears below:

Cal. of Liberate Rolls 2 (1930): 122 (Richard son of Richard de
Chilham styled "king's nephew"), 249 (Richard de Dovor styled "king's
kinsman").

As for Philip Fitz Roy, if you know of a original contemporary record
which specifically refers to Philip as "Philip de Cognac," please let
me know. Kindly provide your source.

Best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah 
FITZROY Richard
 
127 Captain of the "Beagle" on which Charles Darwin wrote "The Origin of the Species".

Kayo Kimura July 11, 2002 English 101.#2 Essay

Robert Fitzroy was the captain of the ship named Beagle, and he asked Darwin to accompany him for a long term of voyage. Darwin was a naturalist, who is known as a scientist for the discovery of the theory of evolution. The story of Darwin Sea Change or Five Years at Table is about their voyage on the ship. Darwin had some different views of the world than Robert Fitzroy. I would like to argue about the hypothesis that the captain influenced Darwin's view, particularly about politics and religion.
First of all, they had once an argument about Tory politics. That was about slavery. "One of Brazil's largest slaveholders had assembled his captives and asked them whether they wished to be freed. Unanimously, they had responded "no. "When Darwin had the temerity to wonder what response made in the owner presence was worth." For a naturalist, Darwin had a doubt that slaves denied to be freed because of the presence of the owner. However, as an illegitimate descendant of King Charles II by his mistress Barbara Villiers, and also an ardent Tory, Fitzroy disagreed with his way of thinking about slaves. Fitzroy was affirmative for the slavery system. 
FITZROY Robert
 
128 1609-69, queen consort of CHARLES I of England, daughter of HENRY IV ofFrance. Her dealings with the pope, foreign powers, and army officersincreased Parliament's suspicion of Charles and fear of a Catholicuprising, and helped to precipitate (1642) the ENGLISH CIVIL WAR.


Source from Hills/Hatcher Family Tree on World Connect 
FRANCE Henriette Marie Princess Of
 
129 I don't have info on the "nursery", but according to Andre Maurois's
"A History of France", (1968 U.S. edition, page 132) Henry II
complained that he was badly treated by the Spanish. Henry and his
brother were held hostage as a result of a treaty his father, Francis
I, negotiated while imprisoned in Spain. In exchange for his freedom
Francis agreed to allow the Emporer the Duchy of Burgundy. Henry and
his brother were held as hostages to guarantee the agreement. But
after Francis I's release, the Burgundians refused to become part of
the Empire. So Henry's grandmother, Louise of Savoy, and the
Emporer's sister, Archduchess Margaret negotiated in 1529 "The Ladies
Peace" (The Peace of Cambrai) which set the ransom for the freedom of
the two princes at two million gold ecus, which the French paid.
There was obviously bad blood between the Valois and Habsburgs. One
clause in the Cambrai treaty required Francis I to marry the Emporer's
sister, Eleanor, which the King did in 1530. Under the circumstance
this proved to be an unhappy marriage.
Maurois writes that as king, Henry II of France, due to the bad
treatment he received during his childhood captivity, hated the
Spanish and especially Charles V.

From: hbv2061@aol.com (History Writer) 
FRANCE Henry II, King of
 
130 BET. 1589 - 1610 King of France
BET. 1572 - 1610 King of Navarre

Henry IV, 1553-1610, King of France (1589-1610) and, as Henry III, King of Navarre (1572-1610), was the first BOURBON monarch of France. Raised as a Protestant, he became (1569) the nominal head of the Huguenots. To save himself from the Saint Bartholomew's Day massacre (1572), Henry renounced his faith. He returned to Protestantism in 1576, however, and led a combined force of Protestants and moderate Catholics against Henry III and the Catholic League (for the resulting conflict see under Henry III, above). Henry became heir to the throne in 1584 and became king after Henry III was assassinated (1589). He defeated the Catholic League at Arques (1589) and Ivry (1590) but abandoned the siege of Paris when the league received aid from Spain. In 1593 Henry again abjured Protestantism, allegedly with the remark Paris is well worth a Mass. He entered the city in 1594, and his conciliatory policy soon won him general support. He waged a successful war (1595-98) against Spain, and by the Edict of NANTES (1598) established political rights and a measure of religious freedom for the Huguenots. The rest of his reign was spent restoring order, industry, and trade. He was assassinated by a fanatic, François Ravaillac. In 1600 Henry had married MARIE DE' MEDICI, and he was succeeded by their son LOUIS XIII. Henry IV's gallantry, wit, and concern for the common people have become legendary.

Source from Hills/Hatcher Family Tree on World Connect 
FRANCE Henry IV "The Great", King of, Henry of Navarre
 
131 Friday, 8 August, 2003

Dear Phil, et al.,

The claim to the French throne by the English monarchs stems from Edward II's marriage to Isabella (the She-wolf to some) of France, daughter of Philip IV.

Philip III of France
_______________I__________________
I I
Philip IV Charles of Valois
_________________________________ I_________
I I I I I
Louis Philip Charles Isabella Philip VI
X V IV = Edward II
I of England
I I
I I
John (Jean) I Edward III


The daughters of the sons of Philip IV were passed over, as the throne went (with the exception of Jean I, King in 1316) from brother to brother. With the death of Charles IV in 1328, the direct male Capetian line had daughtered out, and cousin Philip of Valois was chosen as the next King (reigned 1328-1350).

The contest really got into gear in 1337, with added friction between the
government of Edward III of England and that of Philip VI in Paris with
regard to Edward's lands in France. The claim of Edward III is technically based
on primogeniture, vs. the claim (in Paris) to adhere to 'Salic' law with
inheritance in the male line only.

Of course, in Plantagenet Poker, a few hundred cavalry and archers (with
a few thousand infantry) beats Dieu et Mon Droit. Not just a Highland
tradition: just ask Guillaume le Conquerant.

Cheers,

John P. Ravilious 
FRANCE Isabelle Princess Of
 
132 BET. 1610 - 1643 King of France FRANCE Louis XIII, King Of
 
133 [Hollingg.ged]

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
FREEMAN Mary
 
134 [Hollingg.ged]

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
FREEMAN Mary
 
135 [Hollingg.ged]

Emigrated on the ship - Hudson 1864 with brother Joseph and sister Elizabeth. Joseph was part of the Warren S. Snow Oxteam which departed Nebraska 13 - 17 August 1864 and arrived in SLC 2 Nov 1864. Emily and Elizabeth were likely on this some company, no records of a roster exist however. Joseph being only 14 years old and traveling with Emily and Elizabeth up to this point has been varified. Elizabeth married in SLC in December 1864 in Salt Lake City which falls into line with the oxteam companies arrival.

History of ship - Hudson -

HUDSON
Ship: 1618 tons: 208' x 41' x 29'
Built: 1863 by J. A. and D. D. Westervelt at New York City, New York Captain Isaiah Pratt, a mariner who had as early as 1852 skippered the ship Margaret Evans in the Black X Line, was in command of the large packet ship Hudson on both of her voyages with Mormon emigrants. On 3 June 1864 the first passage began at London with 863 Saints from the British Isles, Switzerland, Germany, and Holland. Elder John M. Kay presided over the emigrant company. His counselors were George Halliday, John L. Smith, and Matthew McCune. Other returning missionaries were Elders Louis A Bertrand, Samuel Neslen, and Thomas O. King The crossing was unusually slow-forty-six days, but the "kindness of Capt. Pratt did much to alleviate the fatigue of the journey." Measles broke out among the children, and nine died and were buried at sea. Soon after landing, another child died at Castle Garden. One woman from Switzerland also died. There were three births. The vessel arrived at New York on 19 July. Three years later-1 June 1867-the Hudson sailed from London with twenty Saints aboard, arriving on 19 July after a forty-eight-day passage.
This full-rigged packet had three decks, a round stern and tuck, and a billethead. Captain Pratt was listed as owner in 1868. Her registration was surrendered 30 September 1878 because the vessel had been sunk sometime earlier.
Passenger List Sources:
LDS Passenger List (Family History Library) Film: #025,692

Death record from Utah shows date of birth as 21 June 1843 Birmingham, England.
Date of death 20 January 1924. Listed as Widow of Wm. Sanders her 2nd husband. Buried City Cemetary 24 Jan 1924.

OBITUARY: SERVICES for Mrs Emily Frisby Holling Saunders, who died Sunday at a local hospital, will be held at 1 o'clock this afternoon at the fourteenth ward chapel under direction of Bishop James M Gilem. Friends may view the body at the N. M. Taylor chapel from 11 to 12:30 o'clock. Mrs Saunders is survived by one son, Marcus W.F. Holling of Portland, Ore.; a brother Lorenzo Frisby, Spokane , Washington; two sisters, Mrs Esther F. Tuckett of Salt Lake and Mrs Ann Burton of Berkley, California, and six grandchildren.

OBITUARY: THE SALT LAKE TRIBUNE, Thursday, January 24, 1924 
FRISBY Emily
 
136 [Hollingg.ged]

Emigrated on the ship - Hudson 1864 with brother Joseph and sister Elizabeth. Joseph was part of the Warren S. Snow Oxteam which departed Nebraska 13 - 17 August 1864 and arrived in SLC 2 Nov 1864. Emily and Elizabeth were likely on this some company, no records of a roster exist however. Joseph being only 14 years old and traveling with Emily and Elizabeth up to this point has been varified. Elizabeth married in SLC in December 1864 in Salt Lake City which falls into line with the oxteam companies arrival.

History of ship - Hudson -

HUDSON
Ship: 1618 tons: 208' x 41' x 29'
Built: 1863 by J. A. and D. D. Westervelt at New York City, New York Captain Isaiah Pratt, a mariner who had as early as 1852 skippered the ship Margaret Evans in the Black X Line, was in command of the large packet ship Hudson on both of her voyages with Mormon emigrants. On 3 June 1864 the first passage began at London with 863 Saints from the British Isles, Switzerland, Germany, and Holland. Elder John M. Kay presided over the emigrant company. His counselors were George Halliday, John L. Smith, and Matthew McCune. Other returning missionaries were Elders Louis A Bertrand, Samuel Neslen, and Thomas O. King The crossing was unusually slow-forty-six days, but the "kindness of Capt. Pratt did much to alleviate the fatigue of the journey." Measles broke out among the children, and nine died and were buried at sea. Soon after landing, another child died at Castle Garden. One woman from Switzerland also died. There were three births. The vessel arrived at New York on 19 July. Three years later-1 June 1867-the Hudson sailed from London with twenty Saints aboard, arriving on 19 July after a forty-eight-day passage.
This full-rigged packet had three decks, a round stern and tuck, and a billethead. Captain Pratt was listed as owner in 1868. Her registration was surrendered 30 September 1878 because the vessel had been sunk sometime earlier.
Passenger List Sources:
LDS Passenger List (Family History Library) Film: #025,692

Death record from Utah shows date of birth as 21 June 1843 Birmingham, England.
Date of death 20 January 1924. Listed as Widow of Wm. Sanders her 2nd husband. Buried City Cemetary 24 Jan 1924.

OBITUARY: SERVICES for Mrs Emily Frisby Holling Saunders, who died Sunday at a local hospital, will be held at 1 o'clock this afternoon at the fourteenth ward chapel under direction of Bishop James M Gilem. Friends may view the body at the N. M. Taylor chapel from 11 to 12:30 o'clock. Mrs Saunders is survived by one son, Marcus W.F. Holling of Portland, Ore.; a brother Lorenzo Frisby, Spokane , Washington; two sisters, Mrs Esther F. Tuckett of Salt Lake and Mrs Ann Burton of Berkley, California, and six grandchildren.

OBITUARY: THE SALT LAKE TRIBUNE, Thursday, January 24, 1924 
FRISBY Emily
 
137 [Hollingg.ged]

Year Emigrated - 1866
Ship Emigrated on - Arkwright
departed - from Liverpool, England 30 May 1866
arrived - New York 6 July 1866
Oxteam to Utah - 137th Company

William Frisby age 58
Elizabeth (Ruff) Frisby age 52
Ephriam Frisby age 18
Lorenzo Frisby age 14
Ester Frisby age 13
Rachael Frisby age 12
Ann Frisby age 7

William and Elizabeth sailed to America on the ship Arkwright along with their 5 youngest
children except for Joseph who emigrated with his sisters in 1864. William was baptized
22 February 1842 in Birmingham, England. William died 3 years after arrival in Utah and Elizabeth died 9 years after reaching Utah. Of their 3 older children - William, Emily Jan, and David - Emily Jane and David died in Utah but heir time of emigration is not known.

Elders John T. Caine and Thomas B. H. Stenhouse met the Arkwright when it arrived in New York. The emigrants were organized into the 137th Company and proceeded to Utah by Ox Team under the direction of Elders John T. Caine and Thomas B.H. Stenhouse.

After arriving in Salt Lake City the Frisby family moved to Coalville, Summit County, where they joined other Saints in establishing this outpost. It was here on November 9, 1868, that Ephraim Frisby married Sarah Ann Lowe , his sweetheart from England who arrived from England
on the ship - John Bright. Lorenzo Frisby married Charlotte Sweeting 14 July 1876 at
Coalville Utah. Charlotte emigrated in 1868 on the ship Colorado with 4 members of her family -
Elizabeth, Martha, George, and Harriet.

1. Ancestral File
2. LDS Emigrant Roster & Voyage History 1840 - 1869 CD.
3. LDS Pioneer Vital Records, Family History Suite CD.
4. Biography of Ephriam Frisby written by Marie (Pulver) Hutchens

History of the ship Arkwright

ARKWRIGHT
Ship: 1267 tons: 197' x 37' x 24'
Built: 1855 at Portsmouth, New Hampshire
Under the command of Captain Daniel P. Caulkins the large square-rigger Arkwright sailed from Liverpool on 30 May 1866. Her passengers consisted of 450 Mormons led by Elder Justin C. Wixom, who was assisted by Elders Henry Luff and Hyrum P. Folsom. During the thirty-seven-day voyage-her average time for westward passages-there were four births and five deaths. When the ship arrived at New York on 6 July, Elders John T. Caine and Thomas B. H.
Stenhouse met the emigrants and arranged for them to continue their journey to Wyoming, Nebraska.
The Arkwright was a two-decker with a round stern and a billethead. From 1863
to 1868 she was in the service of the Dramatic Line. She was later registered at San Francisco, rigged as a three-masted bark, and traded in the Pacific. This vessel sailed the seas for at least thirty-seven years. Her registration was surrendered at Port Townsend, Washington, in 1892 with no reason given. Passenger List Sources:
LDS Passenger List (Family History Library) Film: #175,624 Government Passengers List (Family History Library) Film: #025,692 Identification Number on Government Passenger List: #766

Biography of Williams son Ephraim states that William was born 5 Feb. 1809 at Woverhampton, Staffordshire, England.

Birth record for his son Ephraim (1848) states William's occupation was a stamper.

Birth record for his son Lorenzo (1852) states that William's occupation was a Lampmaker.

Buried in Coalville City Cemetery, Sixth street heading north, second street form north east part of cemetery along with his wife Elizabeth.

Church Ordinance Data: Frisby, William (Male)BaptismDate: February 22, 1842Place: Birmingham, ENGOfficiator: Robert Crook Temple Ordinance Data: Frisby, William (Male)EndowmentDate: November 18, 1866Temple: Endowment House in Salt Lake City
Sealed to Spouse Number 1Date: July 21, 1887Temple: Logan, Cache, UT, USA Vocations: Frisby, William (Male)Lampmaker

"FRISBY, WILLIAM (son of David and Jane Frisby of Wolverhampton, Eng.). Born May, 1809, at Wolverhampton. Came to Utah 1866. Married Elizabeth Ruff 1832 Birmingham, Eng. (daughter of James and Betty Ruff), who was born Oct. 7, 1813.
Their children: William; Jane; Elizabeth; David; Emma; Ephraim; Joseph H.; Lorenzo; Esther; Rachel; Ann.
Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah" 
FRISBY William
 
138 [Hollingg.ged]

Year Emigrated - 1866
Ship Emigrated on - Arkwright
departed - from Liverpool, England 30 May 1866
arrived - New York 6 July 1866
Oxteam to Utah - 137th Company

William Frisby age 58
Elizabeth (Ruff) Frisby age 52
Ephriam Frisby age 18
Lorenzo Frisby age 14
Ester Frisby age 13
Rachael Frisby age 12
Ann Frisby age 7

William and Elizabeth sailed to America on the ship Arkwright along with their 5 youngest
children except for Joseph who emigrated with his sisters in 1864. William was baptized
22 February 1842 in Birmingham, England. William died 3 years after arrival in Utah and Elizabeth died 9 years after reaching Utah. Of their 3 older children - William, Emily Jan, and David - Emily Jane and David died in Utah but heir time of emigration is not known.

Elders John T. Caine and Thomas B. H. Stenhouse met the Arkwright when it arrived in New York. The emigrants were organized into the 137th Company and proceeded to Utah by Ox Team under the direction of Elders John T. Caine and Thomas B.H. Stenhouse.

After arriving in Salt Lake City the Frisby family moved to Coalville, Summit County, where they joined other Saints in establishing this outpost. It was here on November 9, 1868, that Ephraim Frisby married Sarah Ann Lowe , his sweetheart from England who arrived from England
on the ship - John Bright. Lorenzo Frisby married Charlotte Sweeting 14 July 1876 at
Coalville Utah. Charlotte emigrated in 1868 on the ship Colorado with 4 members of her family -
Elizabeth, Martha, George, and Harriet.

1. Ancestral File
2. LDS Emigrant Roster & Voyage History 1840 - 1869 CD.
3. LDS Pioneer Vital Records, Family History Suite CD.
4. Biography of Ephriam Frisby written by Marie (Pulver) Hutchens

History of the ship Arkwright

ARKWRIGHT
Ship: 1267 tons: 197' x 37' x 24'
Built: 1855 at Portsmouth, New Hampshire
Under the command of Captain Daniel P. Caulkins the large square-rigger Arkwright sailed from Liverpool on 30 May 1866. Her passengers consisted of 450 Mormons led by Elder Justin C. Wixom, who was assisted by Elders Henry Luff and Hyrum P. Folsom. During the thirty-seven-day voyage-her average time for westward passages-there were four births and five deaths. When the ship arrived at New York on 6 July, Elders John T. Caine and Thomas B. H.
Stenhouse met the emigrants and arranged for them to continue their journey to Wyoming, Nebraska.
The Arkwright was a two-decker with a round stern and a billethead. From 1863
to 1868 she was in the service of the Dramatic Line. She was later registered at San Francisco, rigged as a three-masted bark, and traded in the Pacific. This vessel sailed the seas for at least thirty-seven years. Her registration was surrendered at Port Townsend, Washington, in 1892 with no reason given. Passenger List Sources:
LDS Passenger List (Family History Library) Film: #175,624 Government Passengers List (Family History Library) Film: #025,692 Identification Number on Government Passenger List: #766

Biography of Williams son Ephraim states that William was born 5 Feb. 1809 at Woverhampton, Staffordshire, England.

Birth record for his son Ephraim (1848) states William's occupation was a stamper.

Birth record for his son Lorenzo (1852) states that William's occupation was a Lampmaker.

Buried in Coalville City Cemetery, Sixth street heading north, second street form north east part of cemetery along with his wife Elizabeth.

Church Ordinance Data: Frisby, William (Male)BaptismDate: February 22, 1842Place: Birmingham, ENGOfficiator: Robert Crook Temple Ordinance Data: Frisby, William (Male)EndowmentDate: November 18, 1866Temple: Endowment House in Salt Lake City
Sealed to Spouse Number 1Date: July 21, 1887Temple: Logan, Cache, UT, USA Vocations: Frisby, William (Male)Lampmaker

"FRISBY, WILLIAM (son of David and Jane Frisby of Wolverhampton, Eng.). Born May, 1809, at Wolverhampton. Came to Utah 1866. Married Elizabeth Ruff 1832 Birmingham, Eng. (daughter of James and Betty Ruff), who was born Oct. 7, 1813.
Their children: William; Jane; Elizabeth; David; Emma; Ephraim; Joseph H.; Lorenzo; Esther; Rachel; Ann.
Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah" 
FRISBY William
 
139 Lost an eye in an accident with a horse. GASCOYNE Mary
 
140 Matilda, daughter of King Henry I of England, *was* her father's heiress.

Henry had 22-24 bastards and a legitimate son, William The Aetheling, who was
drowned in the Wreck of the White Ship on 25 November 1125 ---- ten years
before Henry's death.

So, Henry I had no surviving legitimate son to succeed to the throne.
Matilda, his legitimate daughter, had married Henry V, The Holy Roman Emperor
and was styled as The Empress Matilda in English, as she preferred. Her
husband, Henry V died in 1125 of cancer. The couple had no issue.

Matilda returned to England after the death of her husband and Henry I began
to groom her for succession to the throne. She was widowed and childless as
well as pretty well Germanised [read arrogant and pretentious, in English
eyes], having first gone to the Continent when she was eight years old and
having married Henry V when she was 11.

The British nobles and bishops did not particularly cotton to this
Jennie-foreigner as their future queen ---- but Henry I did his best to secure
their oaths of support that they would loyally defend her claims if she
outlived her father and he left no legitimate son.

Matilda married Geoffrey 'le Bel' comte d'Anjou, Touraine et Maine in 1127.

Now she was Brunhilde with a frog husband in the minds of many of the stalwart
British nobles and bishops.

Henry I died in 1135 without fathering a legitimate son. His death led to a
disputed succession just as had the deaths of the two previous Norman kings of
England, William I 'The Conqueror' and William II 'Rufus'.

When Henry I died on 1 Dec 1135, of a surfeit of lampreys as some say, Matilda
was out of pocket on the Continent.

Stephen, a grandson of William The Conqueror, quickly seized the initiative
and crossed to England to seize the crown where he was accepted as King by the
worthies of London, whose trading connections with Stephen's lands in Boulogne
helped to win them to his side.

Stephen pressed on to Winchester, where his brother, Bishop Henry of
Winchester, persuaded an initially reluctant Archbishop of Canterbury to crown
Stephen as King, the custodian of the treasure to hand over the keys, and the
magnates who were present to accept him as monarch.

Some of the nobles and clerics seem to have abandoned Matilda because they
construed their oath to Henry I to have held only if Henry did not give his
daughter Matilda in marriage to anyone outside the Kingdom without consulting
them.

A Great Civil War ensued when Matilda tried to fight back and reclaim the
throne in 1139. This Civil War lasted until 1153 when Stephen finally agreed
to allow Matilda's son Henry to succeed him on the throne as Henry II
'Curtmantle'. Yes, the one who was married to Eleanor of Aquitaine,
Richardson. Henry II also inherited his father Geoffrey's lands and titles.
Geoffrey was quite a dashing figure, the Antonio Banderas of his day. 
GERMANY Matilda (Maud) Empress Of
 
141 One of the most famous women of history.
Lady Godiva, who rode naked through the streets of Coventry, as a protest against taxation.
http://www.rootsweb.com/~nwa/godiva.html
http://www.abacom.com/~jkrause/godiva.html

Elizabeth II (Alexandra Mary) WINDSOR Queen of England is the 31st great granddaughter of Lady GODIVA Countess Of Mercia.

Lady GODIVA Countess Of Mercia is the 26th great grandmother of Thomas JEFFERSON.

So-called President George W. BUSH is the 33rd great grandson of Lady GODIVA Countess Of Mercia.

Nikolas II ROMANOV Czar of Russia was the 30th great grandson of Lady GODIVA Countess Of Mercia.

Louis XVI, King Of FRANCE was the 27th great grandson of Lady GODIVA Countess Of Mercia.

Diana SPENCER was the 32nd great granddaughter of Lady GODIVA Countess Of Mercia.

Juan Carlos DE BORBON King of Spain is the 32nd great grandson of Lady GODIVA Countess Of Mercia.

Simeon KOBURGOTSKI King and Prime Minister of Bulgaria is the 33rd great grandson of Lady GODIVA Countess Of Mercia.

She was a religious benefactress who---according to tradition when her husband Leofric, Earl of Mercia, imposed a heavy tax on the townsfolk of Coventry (1040)---obtained its remission by riding naked through the market place. The story occurs in Roger of Wendover (1235). Some writers assert that Lady Godiva ordered all to remain indoors, which they did except for the famous Peeping Tom, but he is a later addition to the story.

An explanation of the Lady Godiva story could well be the survival of a Celtic pagan celebration in honour of the goddess-spirit, Epona. To celebrate the passage of the Moon accross the night sky and, at the same time, the change from winter to spring, a tradition of a naked lady with long hair riding on a white horse had survived. Quite possibly Leofric, Earl of Mercia, had dared his wife, Godiva, to take the local girl's place in the procession. 
GODIVA Lady, Countess Of Mercia
 
142 It is impossible to state exactly the date of Harold's visit to Duke William in Normandy, although it is put at 1064. Probably Harold did make some kind of oath to William, most likely under compulsion. It is certain, however, that Harold helped William in a war with the Bretons.

On his return he married Ealdgyth, Griffith's widow, even though Edith Swan-neck, who had borne him five children, was still alive. In 1065 the Northumbrians rebelled against Tostig and Harold acquiesced in their choice of Morcar and Tostig's banishment. In January 1066 King Edward died. Harold, his nominee, was chosen king and crowned in Westminster Abbey.

Duke William lost no time in preparing for the invasion of England; and Tostig, after trying the Normans and the Scots, succeeded in drawing Harold Hardrada, King of Norway, to his side. In September the two reached the Humber and Harold marched to meet them. At Stamford Bridge he won a complete victory on 25 September 1066, Tostig and Harald Hardrada being among the slain. But four days later William landed at Pevensey. Harold marched southwards with the utmost dispatch and the two armies met at Senlac, about nine miles from Hastings. From nine in the morning, 14 November 1066, the English fought stubbornly until nightfall, when the pretended flight of the Normans drew them from their impregnable position and gave the Normans victory. Harold himself fell pierced through the eye with an arrow. His body was recognised by Edith Swan-neck and he was buried at Waltham. 
GODWINSSON Harold II
 
143 Killed at the Battle of Shrewsbury on 21 Jul 1403. GOUSHILL Robert
 
144 In 1832, the Great powers (England, Russia abd France offered the new kingdom of Greece to Prince Otto of Bavaria; Otto was a well- intentioned monarch but that was not enough for the turbulent Greek people and a revolt forced Otto to approve a constitution and a second one in 1862 forced hi to abdicate. The vacant Greek crown was then offered to Queen Victoria's second son Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh, but the British government refused since there was an international agreement that established that no member of the British Royal family was elegible for the Greek throne. Nevertheless, England was deeply interested in Greece since she wanted to increase her infuence in the Aegean. If Prince Alfred could not be king, there were other candidates, and the elected was the second son of Prince Christian of Schleswig Holstein Sonderburg Glucksburg, the seventeen-year-old Prince William of Denmark.
The Greeks accepted the choice. A King suported by England meant the return of the Ionian Islands, now in British hands. Besides, Prince William was closely related to the British Royal family since his sister Alexandra had just married the Prince of Wales.

On March 30, 1863, the Greek National Assembly proclaimed William as King George I of the Hellenes. William,a frank and cheerful young man, who loved joking, was happy about acceptng the Greek crown, but not his father, Prince Christian, nor his mother, Princess Luise, who apealed to her daughter, the Princess of Wales to influence the British government against the match and wrote to Queen Victoria, looking for her support; but everything was unuseful against William becoming King of the Hellenes. Even King Frederik VII of Denmark supported the idea. Christian had to accept but he established some conditions: the three Great Powers must guaranteee his son 25,000 pounds a year in case of being dethroned and the Ionian Islands should be returned to Greece by England. On June 6, 1863, Prince William formally accepted the Greek crown.
In October that same year, the young King George arrived in Greece. He soon realised he had received one of the poorest, bad organized and unstable countries in Europe. The Royal Palace, where he would live, was in a deplorable condition, having been victim of vandalism since King Otto's departure. The Danish Prince faced the difficulties of his new possition with great aplomb, and he identified himself with his new country as much as posssible. He quicly lernt the Greek language and he visited every part of the country, even by mule or on foot. He remained Protestant but he paid a great respect to the Greek orthodox Church. King George forced his Greek ministers to frame a new constitution which resulted very liberal for those days. Altough he could appoint and dismiss ministers as well as to disolve the assembly, he involved himself as little as possible in internal politics. Most of the times, he left the politicians to resolv problems, interfiring only in time of crisis. He didn't favpour any party.

After four years of reigning, King George began to think in marriage in order to establish a dynasty. He tought Russia would provide him of a suitable wife since his future children would have to be Orthodox and only in Russia he could find an Orthodox princess. And so he did. In October, 1867 King George of the Hellenes married in the Winter Palace to the fifteen-year-old daughter of Grand Duke Constantine (Alexander II's younger brother), Grand Duchess Olga. Nine months later, the new Queen of Greece geve birth to her first son. He was named Consantine and soon was followed by six more children (4 boys and 2 girls), who grew up lovingly and naturally. ing George bought for his family a 40,000 acre property, fifteen miles north of Athens, which was named Tatoi. George gave tatoi a danish character; more trees were planted, the roads were fixed, Danish agricultural methods were introduced, barns and stables were built and Danish and Swiss cows were imported, and soon Tatoi had become a complete Danish farm.
Altough King George was a Dane in private, he was a Greek in public life. he had a compromise with the "Great Hellenic Dream", the return to Greece of Crete, Thessaly, Espirus, and most of all, Constantinople, then in Turkish hands.
By 1897, when King George was 51 years old and had been for 34 years in the throne, his subjects, with the firm purpose of achieving the "Great Hellenic Dream", were claiming for action. The Greek population in the island of Crete rose upo against the Turks and King George sent a Greek troop commanded by his second son, Prince George, to support the rebels. The Great Powers feared a war between Greece and Turkey and sent an international force to Crete, ordering Prince George to retreat. But Greece was determined to keep her troops in Crete, and moreover, the Greeks in Turkish-ruled Macedonia revolted. On April 17, Turkey declared war on Greece. A week later, the Greek army, under the comand of Crown Prince Constantine, was defeated by the Turks. King george turned to his relations among European royalty, but neither England, nor Russia, nor Germany were able to help him. On the contrary, Germany, who supported Turkey, imposed humilliant conditions to Greece. The Greek troops must withdraw from Crete and the North Greek frontier was modified in Turkish's favour. Thanks to the intervention of Tsar Nicholas II and of the Prince of Wales, the terms were less hard. King George was now unpopular among his subjects and he retired with his family toTatoi.

Thirteen years later, Eleftherio Venizelos became Prime Minister of Greece. He was fired with the spirit of the "Great Hellenic Dream". Greece must take revange against Turkey for the defeat of 1897 and the government must have a stable government and a strong army, so Venizelos devoted himself to review the Constitution and reorganized the army. In everything he did, he had the King's support. The Minister reinstalled Prince Constantine as Commander in Chief of the Army and by 1912 he had arranged military alliances with his neighbours, Bulgaria and Serbia. Now Greece was ready for war. This time the Greeks were luckier, and their army, under Prince Constantine's personal command, gained one victory after other. In November, 1912, the Greeks took Salonica, the capital of Macedonia, which had been under the Turks for more than a century. King George, Prince Constantine and Minister Venizelos rode triumphantly through the streets. By January, Greece had recovered Espirus and Turkey was forced to withdraw almost entirely from Europe, remaining only in Constantinople. Greece had almost doubled her territory and King George was again a national hero. He spent some wonderful days after his entry to salonica, receiving congratulations from his Danish relatives, even Kaiser Wilhelm II sent his sister Sophie (who was Prince Constantine's wife) a congratulations message. He announced that on October 26 that same year, at the golden jubilee of his reign he would abdicate on his son Constantine. But.... on the afternoon of March 18, 1913, King George went for a walk trough the streets of Salonica, accompanied by an aide. On their way to the harbour, they passed by a cafe, the "Pasha Liman", where was a strange man who looked closely at them, as they passed. On their way back, the King and his companion passed again by the cafe. The man was still there and when the King passed by his side, the man drew out a revolver and shot the King in the back; within seconds, he was dead. His companion seized the assasin by the throat until two policeman came. The man was mentally deranged and he later committed suicide whilst awaiting for his trial.

King George's body was taken back to Athens and he was buried in a chapel built on a little hill near Tatoi, known as Paleocastro.
 
GREECE Georgios (Christian Vilhelm) I
 
145 In 1832, the Great powers (England, Russia and France offered the new kingdom of Greece to Prince Otto of Bavaria; Otto was a well- intentioned monarch but that was not enough for the turbulent Greek people and a revolt forced Otto to approve a constitution and a second one in 1862 forced him to abdicate.
The vacant Greek crown was then offered to Queen Victoria's second son Alfred, Duke of Edimburgh, but the British government refused since there was an international agreement that established that no member of the British Royal family was elegible for the Greek throne. Neveertheless, England was deeply interested in Greece since she wanted to inccrease her infuence in the Aegean. If Prince Alfred could not be king, there were other candidates. and the elected was the second son of Prince Christian of Schleswig Holstein Sonderburg Glucksburg, the seventeen-year-old Prince William of Denmark. The Greeks accepted the choice. A King suportted by England meant the return of the Ionian Islands, now in British hands. Besides, Prince William was closely related to the British Royal family since his siser Alexandra had just married the Prince of Wales.

King George I of Greece


On March 30, 1863, the Greek National Assembly proclaimed William as King George I of the Hellenes. William,a frank and cheerful young man, who loved joking, was happy about acceptng the Greek crown, but not his father, Prince Christian, nor his mother, Princess Luise, who apealed toher daughter the Princess of Wales to influence the British government against the match and wrote Queen Victoria, looking for her support; but everything was unuseful against William becoming King of the Hellenes. Even King Frederik VII of Denmark supported the idea. Christian had to accept but he established some conditions: the three Great Powers must guaranteee his son 25,000 pounds a year in case of being dethroned and the Ionian Islands should be returned to Greece by England.On June 6, 1863, Prince William formally accepted the Greek crown.
In October that same year, the young King George arrived in Greece. He soon realised he had received one of the poorest, bad organized and unstable countries in Europe. The Royal Palace, where he would live, was in a deplorable condition, having been victim of vandalism since King Otto's departure. The Danish Prince faced the difficulties of his new possition with great aplomb, and he identified himself with his new country as much as posssible. He quicly lernt the Greek language and he visited every part of the country, even by mule or on foot. He remained Protestant but he paid a great respect to the Greek orthodox Church. King George forced his Greek ministers to frame a new constitution which resulted very liberal for those days. Altough he could appoint and dismiss ministers as well as to disolve the assembly, he involved himself as little as possible in internal politics. Most of the times, he left the politicians to resolv problems, interfiring only in time of crisis. He didn't favpour any party.
After four years of reigning, King George began to think in marriage in order to establish a dynasty. He tought Russia would provide him of a suitable wife since his future children would have to be Orthodox and only in Russia he could find an Orthodox princess. And so he did. In October, 1867 King George of the Hellenes married in the Winter Palace to the fifteen-year-old daughter of Grand Duke Constantine (Alexander II's younger brother), Grand Duchess Olga. Nine months later, the new Queen of Greece geve birth to her first son. He was named Consantine and soon was followed by six more children (4 boys and 2 girls), who grew up lovingly and naturally. ing George bought for his family a 40,000 acre property, fifteen miles north of Athens, which was named Tatoi. George gave tatoi a danish character; more trees were planted, the roads were fixed, Danish agricultural methods were introduced, barns and stables were built and Danish and Swiss cows were imported, and soon Tatoi had become a complete Danish farm.
Altough King George was a Dane in private, he was a Greek in public life. he had a compromise with the "Great Hellenic Dream", the return to Greece of Crete, Thessaly, Espirus, and most of all, Constantinople, then in Turkish hands.
By 1897, when King George was 51 years old and had been for 34 years in the throne, his subjects, with the firm purpose of achieving the "Great Hellenic Dream", were claiming for action. The Greek population in the isalnd of Crete rose upo against the Turks and King George sent a Greek troop commanded by his second son, Prince George, to support the rebels. The Great Powers feared a war between Greece and Turkey and sent an international force to Crete, ordering Prince George to retreat. But Greece was determined to keep her troops in Crete, and moreover, the Greeks in Turkish-ruled Macedonia revolted. On April 17, Turkey declared war to Greece. A week later, the Greek army, under the comand of Crown Prince Constantine, was defetaed by the Turks. King george turned to his raltions among European royalty, but neither England, nor Russia, nor Germany were able to help him. On he contrary, Germany, who supported Turkey, imposed humilliant conditions to Greece. The Greek troops must withdraw from Crete and the North Grreek frontier was modified in Turkish's favour. Thanks to the intervention of Tsar Nicholas II and of the Prince of Wales, the terms were less hard. King George was now unpopular among his subjects and he retiredwith his family toTatoi.

Thirteen years later, Eleftherio Venizelos became Prime Minister of Greece. He was fired with the spirit of the "Great Hellenic Dream". Greece must tooke revange against Turkey for the defeat of 1897 and the government must had a stable govenrment and a strong army, so Venizelos devoted himself to review the Constitution and reorganized the army. In everything he did, he had the King's support. The Minister reinstalled Prince Constantine as Commander in Chief of the Army and for 1912 he had aranged military alliances with his neighbours, Bulgaria and Serbia. Now Greece was ready for war. This time the reeks were luclier, and thier army, under Prince Constantine's personal command, gained one victory after other. In November, 1912, the Greeks took Salonica, the capital of Macedonia, which had been under the Turks for more than a century. King George, Prince Constantine and Minister Venizelos rode triumphantly through the streets. By January, Greece had recovered Espirus and Turkey was forced to withdrawalmost entirely from Europe, remaining only in Constantinople. Greece had almost doubled her territory and King George was again a national heroe. He spent some wonderful days after his entry to salonica, receiving congratulations from his Danish relatives, even Kaiser Wilhelm II sent his sister Sophie (who was Prince Constantine's wife) a congratulations message. He announced that on October 26 that same year, at the golden jubilee of his reign he would abdicate on his son Constantine. But it would not be time for the abdication; on the afternoon of March 18, 1913, King George went for a walk trough the streets of Salonica, accompanied by an aide. On their way to the harbour, they passed by a cafe, the "Pasha Liman", where was astarnge man who look closely to them, as they passed. On their way back, the King and his companion passed again by the cafe. The man was still there and when the King passed by his side, the man drew out a revolver and shot the King in the back; within seconds, he was dead. His companion seized the assasin by the throat until two policeman came. The man was mentally deranged and he commit suicide while awaiting for his trial.

King George's body was taken back to Athens and he was buried in a chapel built on a little hill near Tatoi, known as Paleocastro.
 
GREECE Georgios (Christian Vilhelm) I
 
146 [Hollingg.ged]

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
GRESELL Sarah
 
147 [Hollingg.ged]

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
GRESELL Sarah
 
148 [Hollingg.ged]

Annie's parents are Jacob Grover and Annie Elizabeth Smith.

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
GROVER Annie Inez
 
149 [Hollingg.ged]

Annie's parents are Jacob Grover and Annie Elizabeth Smith.

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
GROVER Annie Inez
 
150 [Hollingg.ged]

Harriet's parents are Jacob Grover and Annie Elizabeth Smith. Harriet is also the sister of Annie Elizabeth Grover Toone, William Henry Toone Jr.
wife.

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. 
GROVER Harriet Bertha
 

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